Posted by: episystechpubs | April 21, 2016

Editor’s Corner: Perfect Pangrams

A pangram is a sentence that uses every letter of the alphabet at least once. Kara previously discussed pangrams here and here.

The most well-known pangram, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” has 35 letters, including two H’s, two R’s, two T’s, two U’s, three E’s, and four O’s.

A perfect pangram is a sentence that uses every letter of the alphabet exactly once. Language aficionados have suggested several perfect pangrams. Are they valid sentences or incomprehensible gibberish? Judge for yourself from the following examples:

Squdgy fez, blank jimp crwth vox (by Claude Shannon)

What it means: Squat, pudgy (squdgy) brimless hat (fez), obstruct (blank) the voice (vox) of a slender (jimp) Celtic violin (crwth).

Note: Vox is Latin for voice. It is not found in Merriam-Webster, except as part of the phrase vox populi (voice of the people).

Bortz waqf glyphs vex muck djin (by Ed Spargo)

What it means: Symbols (glyphs) indicating an Islamic endowment (waqf) of inferior diamonds (bortz) annoy (vex) dirt genies (muck djin).

Jink cwm, zag veldt, fob qursh pyx (by Stephen Wagner)

What it means: Move quickly with sudden turns (jink and zag) across mountain hollow (cwm) and African grassland (veldt) to deceitfully obtain (fob) a box (pyx) of Saudi coins (qursh).

Ben Ritter | Technical Editor | Symitar®
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