Posted by: episystechpubs | May 19, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Timepieces

Top of the morning to you!

I was wearing a wristwatch recently, and my two-year old grandson touched it and said, “clock.” And I said “Yes, it is a kind of clock. It’s a watch.” And I immediately knew this was an Editor’s Corner moment.

Why do we call timepieces that are mounted on the wall or mantel clocks and timepieces on our wrists or in our pockets watches?

According to an article on the Grammarphobia website, the term watch did not originate from the act of watching your watch (be it a pocket watch or a wristwatch) as you might imagine. It actually comes from the Old English word wæcce or wæccan, and it refers to wakefulness, particularly to the sense of staying awake to guard or observe something.

After reading that, you might still be confused about why we call the timepiece we wear on our wrist a watch. I was,so I continued reading, and the article goes on to say that a watch was originally a device that was used to wake people up so they could stand their watch—a sort of alarm clock. Closer, but still not what we think of as a watch today.

In Middle English, the word for an alarm that was attached to a clock and that was used to wake people was wecche, and the word for clock was clokke. So, you would have a wecche on your clokke (nothing at all like having a burr on your hide or a bee in your bonnet).

Moving along in time, several citations from the Oxford English Dictionary, dating back to the late 1500s, use the word watch to refer to a small timepiece that is spring driven and small enough to be carried in the pocket. So there’s your pocket watch, friends!

According to a New York Timesarticle, the first wristwatch was made for Countess Koscowicz of Hungary in 1868 by a Swiss manufacturer named Patek Philippe. And wristwatches for men came soon after. This article states that the first wristwatches for men were produced after an officer in the German Imperial Navy, in 1880, “complained that operating a pocket watch was difficult when timing a bombardment,” so he strapped his pocket watch to his wrist, and that lead to small timepieces being attached to bracelets. And there you have your first wristwatches, friends!

My curiosity is quelled. We can all thank little Jack Burcher for today’s Editor’s Corner topic.

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara and <a href="mailto:DBurcher.

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Good morning, everyone! Today’s topic is another “word about words” from Dictionary.com: snowclone. A snowclone is a “cliché or templated phrase that can have different words filled in” to describe new situations. For example, the slogan for the movie Alien (1979) was “In space, no one can hear you scream”; the template for these Alien snowclones is: In space, no one can hear you X. Some resulting snowclones are:

  • In space, no one can hear you belch.
  • In space, no one can hear you complain.
  • In space, no one can hear you DJ.
  • In space, no one can hear you dream.

The following snowclones are from Wikipedia and others are from pop culture.

X is the new Y

  • Orange Is the New Black (Netflix℠ series)
  • gray is the new black
  • 50 is the new 40
  • Quiet Is the New Loud (album name)

The mother of all X

(From Wikipedia) The phrase entered American popular culture in September 1990 at the outset of the Gulf War, when Saddam Hussein’s Revolutionary Command Council warned the U.S.-led Coalition against military action in Kuwait with the statement "Let everyone understand that this battle is going to become the mother of all battles."

To X or not to X

Well, without the X, most of us would know this as “To be or not to be,” a famous line from Shakespeare’s Hamlet. But as a template, it seems to be used for a lot of things besides just “being.” When I Googled “X or not to X,” one article in Snowclones.org says that there are “13 million plus hits for it…with over 700 different variations on X, including rent, file, cut, drink, teach, speak, grow, herd, cheat, certify, etc.”

Have X, Will Travel

This snowclone holds a soft spot in my heart. I used to love listening to the Have Gun – Will Travel radios shows when driving the road from Seattle to San Francisco and back. Here are some other snowclones from this phrase:

  • Have Tux, Will Travel (memoir of Bob Hope, 1954)
  • Have Gun – Will Travel (1957 Western series)
  • Have Guitar Will Travel (1960 Bo Diddley album)
  • Have Rocket, Will Travel (1959, The Three Stooges film)

There are other snowclones out there, but some of them aren’t pleasant. I like to keep this a happy place, so I hope you have a good day!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | May 12, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Crash blossoms

Good morning!

As promised weeks ago, I have another term from Dictionary.com that was new to me and I thought I would share it with all y’all. Today’s term is crash blossom. A crash blossom is an ambiguously worded news headline that can lead to confusion or laughter. Crash blossoms are generally due to space restrictions for article titles. They might start out a little too long, or not exciting enough to grab the reader’s eye, but by over-editing, you can end up with some crazy headlines. Over the years, many of you have sent me your local versions of crash blossoms, which are always amusing.

The term crash blossom comes from a newspaper title about an airplane crash. From the New York Times Magazine:

For years, there was no good name for these double-take headlines. Last August, however, one emerged in the Testy Copy Editors online discussion forum. Mike O’Connell, an American editor based in Sapporo, Japan, spotted the headline “Violinist Linked to JAL Crash Blossoms” and wondered, “What’s a crash blossom?”

Another participant in the forum, Dan Bloom, suggested that “crash blossoms” could be used as a label for such infelicitous headlines that encourage alternate readings, and news of the neologism quickly spread.

And now, for some crash blossom examples (titles formatted differently according to different style guides):

§ Doctors Help Bee Sting Victims

§ Dead Man Remains Discovered by Police

§ Party Head Eyes Flexing Muscles by Handing Arms to Foot Soldiers

§ Giant Waves Down Queen Mary’s Funnel

§ MacArthur Flies Back to Front

§ Eighth Army Push Bottles Up Germans

§ Squad Helps Dog Bite Victim

§ Red Tape Holds Up New Bridge

§ Infant pulled from wrecked car involved in short police pursuit

§ McDonald’s fries the holy grail for potato farmers

§ Lawmen from Mexico Barbecue Guests

§ Genetic Engineering Splits Scientists

§ Girl found alive in France murders car

§ Trump demands dog “Dreamers” deal

§ Death Happens Slower Than Thought

§ Orthodox Jew Flies in Plane Covered in Huge Plastic Bag, Possibly to Avoid Cemetery Flyover

§ Lance Armstrong Admits Doping in Oprah Winfrey Interview

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | May 10, 2022

Editor’s Corner: The final haiku

Hello all! Today is the last of the haiku you submitted for the contest. Three cheers to all of you who sent in your works of art. Today is sort of a free-for-all topic-wise. Most of these have the haiku, then author listed, but towards the end I have the author first because some of you sent in a lot of haiku. The ones that won’t get me in trouble are all here! Thank you so much for sharing with us!

She’s a Looker Haiku

My girl is real cute

She’s in the mirror all day

I’m still waiting to see me

T. Fluellen

Dream Ride Haiku

That ride was hilly

Maybe I need a new bike

Did I just dream that?

T. Fluellen

Hope

Hope springs eternal

Hope my Astros aren’t cheating

Baseball brings us hope

B. Jones

Stone nymph, haiku dream

While moist mulch pokes under brick

It’s time for Wordle

K. Halvin

Wordle obsession

Three vowels in starting word

Two options… well crap…

B. Jones

Haiku for Calvin’s Dad

Why do ice cubes float?

It’s cold, ice wants to get warm.

Nearer sun’s warmer.

Chris Aston

Ode to My Hair-Challenged Dad

So bright and shiny

My noggin painfully red

Oh no, my bald head

B. Selden

For evermore die

Said the chirping wire bird

Be nigh silent bud

Marty Griffin

Haiku for the Reader

A used book for me?

One more is always welcome.

It still reads as new.

C. Aston

They want me badly

I sneak out of Trader Joe’s

“Sign this petition”

E. Boyd

Wife, Augie, Mustang

Retirement plans in progress

Warmer climate time!

M. Murrock, ACCESS FCU

Haiku Pikachu

Where can I find you today?

I know, look for you.

S. Walter

Diplomacy, yes.

Open hand slap not the best.

Peace and love to all.

E. Flick

“Big cars are comfy,”

I think, as I stop for gas

Again and again.

J. Lucas

Last day of the month

Getting older, time goes fast

Hello to next month

E. Flick

Haiku for Teenagers

Clothes exit the dryer

Clean plates leave the dishwasher

Trash departs your room

B. Jones

************************************************************************

D. Isaman

Haiku Trouble #2

People are lazy

I hate when things aren’t finished

Like a haiku

Haiku Trouble #3

I tried to write a haiku,

But I got reversed

The structure of a haiku

Hearts

With blood the heart beats,

But can two hearts beat the odds?

Together ours can!

M. Acuff

Haiku Season of Truth

Ode to my mailbox

So strong and stately you stood

Now you’re just rubbish

A pile of brown bricks

No match for Maggie Mazda

You did leave a mark!

Expenses for both

Incurred by the spouse un-named

I dare not complain

C. Sparkman

They grow up so fast…

Diapers are not cheap

Two transmission replacements

Grown kids have grown bills

Digital grandkids

FaceTime me Gramma

Text my line or Tweet or Skype

I’ll call you later

Empty Nesters

This is not my cake

I can’t deny I ate it

No one else to blame

W. Ponath

You Are

You are my best friend.

All that I think of is you.

My heart is so full.

Rain Tears

Rain falls on my face.

But the sun will shine again.

Can I cry till then?

New Pup

We have a new pup.

He knows where to pee and poop.

We love him so much.

It’s Too Early

My room is all dark.

My alarm clock is ringing.

The bed is so warm.

Gone Fishing

I have some free time.

I like fishing from the pier.

Fish do not know me.

So Sad

Can love become hate?

Can good ever become bad?

Oh, without a doubt.

Summer Rain

The clouds are building,

Rain on asphalt, what a smell!

I love summer storms.

Last One?

This is the last one;

or does it need to be last?

Maybe it’s penultimate.

I Am

To be, not to be!

What is to be, not to be?

I am that I am.

Mike Timmerman

[KC] Your haiku were great

With Sandy Bottom funnies

I laughed every time.

High upon their thrones

Counting syllables with glee

Editors delight

Before it’s too late

I’m begging you to listen

Refinance today.

It was really good

The haiku that I thought of

Alas, it is gone.

Rising from ashes

Haiku versus Godzilla

Tokyo saved again

Idiom Haiku

It was puppy love

With the apple of my eye

Then we tied the knot

Candy Bar Haiku Duel: K. Slayton and J. Matheney

Payday candy bars!

So, what is Hershey’s quota?

How many loose nuts?

K. Slayton

Nothing hits the floor

When Matheney eats Paydays

All in one big bite.

J. Matheney

That’s true to the word!

There’s only one nice big bite.

Watch out! The wrapper!

K. Slayton

Plastic’s everywhere

Oceans, rivers, lakes, and streams…

But not in my gut.

J. Matheney

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | May 5, 2022

Editor’s Corner: New Word Thursday – Sealioning

Good day to you!

The word sealioning came into my inbox recently (in an email from Dictionary.com) and I did a doubletake. I love sea lions! Who doesn’t?

Here in San Diego, we have several beautiful coastal areas where you can observe seals and sea lions in their natural habitat. All along La Jolla Cove, you can watch them sun, and swim, and play. And during the pupping season (May–June), you can get a breathtaking view of the fluffy little pups. Watching them makes me happy; after all, they’re called the dogs of the ocean. I love dogs! I love the ocean!

However, the term sealioning doesn’t portray the same happy attitude as the animals themselves. Here’s an explanation of the term from Dictionary.com:

Sealioning is a critical term for a form of trolling that involves relentlessly pestering someone with questions and requests (such as for evidence or sources), typically with the goal of upsetting them and making their position or viewpoint seem weak or unreasonable.

The verb form sealion (or sea lion) is also used.

These terms are typically applied to online contexts, such as social media, forums, and message boards (although it can also happen offline).

Sealioning often involves giving off the impression of sincere curiosity and an open mind, using polite-sounding language, and framing the questioning as part of honest intellectual debate. However, the real goal of such behavior is to irritate the other person until that person gets angry or upset, thus allowing the questioner to portray themselves as a victim as an attempt to diminish a position or viewpoint they disagree with.

I didn’t know the name of it, but this is definitely one of the reasons I have such limited online presence.

But where did the term sealioning come from? I was surprised it had such a negative connotation until the Dictionary.com article explained its origin:

The term and concept of sealioning was popularized by the 2014 webcomic “The Terrible Sea Lion” by artist David Malki. In the comic, a person states in a private conversation that they dislike sea lions. In response, a sea lion suddenly appears and relentlessly harasses the person by asking them to provide evidence that supports their negative opinion of sea lions. The sea lion pretends to be nice and reasonable while still following the person to their home and continuing to harass them, even when they are trying to sleep. When the person gets upset and asks the sea lion to leave, the sea lion claims they have done nothing to deserve such rudeness. Malki has explained that the sea lion in the comic was intended to represent certain types of behavior.

The term is now most commonly used to call out such behavior on social media, where it’s considered a specific type of trolling.

So, there you go. As so often happens, one obnoxious individual (in this case a sea lion) has ruined it for all the rest. But I don’t want you to leave with a negative impression of all seals and sea lions. I’ve lived near them all my life, and I can honestly say that every single one I’ve met has been the epitome of graciousness.

Adorable sea lion pup

An excerpt from David Malki’s “The Terrible Sea Lion.”

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara and <a href="mailto:DBurcher.

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | May 3, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Haiku Installment #2

Happy May!

Today I have the second set of haiku submissions from all of you wonderful contributors. Like last week’s submissions, I have grouped them (roughly) by topic. I have haiku about work, punctuation, and animals.

Work-Related

Not Again…

Video meeting.

I share a great idea,

And I am on mute.

H. Blades

Working Remote Haiku

Sweat pants on, hair done.

Three Teams calls, video on.

Pets better behave!

M. Cornell

It’s regression time

Testing is like pest control,

Getting the bugs out!

S.Fordice

Core conversion ends

The stressful time is over

Now we can relax

S. Hrnack, Southwest Airlines FCU

Great Resignation.

People leaving toxic jobs.

They are better off.

J. Lucas

I am so tired,

Why does my wrist keep buzzing?

It’s time to get up.

J. Mason

Searching for a way

Out of this forest of code

Need to burn it all

R. Sunbury

Time: early morning

The alarm shocks me awake

Blankets hold me down

Jeff Montgomery

My boss says to sell.

FIs buy our great products.

They love JHA.

Sharon McCluskey

I want suggestions

My mind it is now just blank

YouTube is more fun

P. Davis

Computer expert

My skills can be high level

Google hits count more

P. Davis

Punctuation

I offer a brief explanation here. The first haiku references an argument Richard Sunbury and I have been having for the past 20+ years about the Oxford (serial) comma. The “Three for One” offerings refer to this article I posted a few weeks ago about the misunderstood ellipsis.

Why use when written

No spoken equivalent

Scram Oxford comma

R. Sunbury

Three for One

"Oh Millennial…
The ellipsis ain’t no diss…
just some words are missed…"

Poor grammar you say?

Sadly my mind goes astray

by the end of day.

And now I do fear

that in my dreams will appear

angry dot dot dots.

S.D. Pullera

Animals

Josie the Corgi

The black Corgi barks

Throw the ball! Throw the ball now!

Retrieved! Throw again!

D. Seufert

Haiku by a Dog

Can I have a treat?

Wait—stranger at the door—

Back. About that treat…

B. Jones

We all love kittens,

But the trouble comes later.

They all become cats.

P. Ruffin

“Why do I feed you?”

“So I can crap in the yard.

Fetch me a treat, Dad.”

M. Bohlmann

The Bohlmann Puppy Poopers

Sun has just gone down.

The spiders’ eyes are aglow?!

Turn off the flashlight!

S. Hrnack, Southwest Airlines FCU

Pandemic puppy!

Wanted a dog for long time!

Happy to be home!

M. Murrock, ACCESS FCU

Auggie, the pandemic puppy

Living With a Cat

What do you want now?

Why are you screaming at me?

I just gave you food.

R. Sunbury

Are you going out?

Or do you want to stay in?

Make up your damn mind.

R. Sunbury

Haiku for a Husky

Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur.

Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur.

Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur, Fur.

C. Aston

Alcide (You can call me Al) Aston

Present from the Dog

Fed the dogs their meal.

Went for a quick walk too soon.

Food came up again.

M. Cornell

The Cornell Pack

Present from the Cat

Look what I have here.

What? You don’t like headless mice?

You can kill them then.

M. Cornell

Mule

Horses are noble

But whoever bred a mule

Did a half-ass job

D. Isaman

With warmer weather,

Darkling beetles mate and die.

Fetch broom and dustpan.

K. Lacey

Ditzy is my dog.

She is very talkative.

Like now at dinner.

R. Reed-Curl

Ditzy and Squeeky

My little Oscar,

Oh, how I love you so much

Never ever go!

S. Walter

Until next week, when I’ll provide you the remainder of the contest haiku!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | April 28, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Haikuapalooza

Good morning, folks!

Today I will start sharing the many haiku you sent in. I added punctuation to some, I didn’t include wakas, and I didn’t include those with the wrong syllable count. Oh yes, and I left out most of the ones with naughty imagery and four-letter words. This is the first installment, roughly grouped by content. Thank you so much for participating!

The Contest

Hello there, Kara!

Here is my contest entry.

I hope you like it!

Kiko Garcia

A haiku contest

Fun, brain-wracking exercise

But can I win it?

P. Ruffin

Haikus are too hard

Limericks are easier

No Nantucket, please

K. Slayton

Here is my attempt

To give this contest a whirl

These feel weird to write.

S. Walter

She called the poet

I implore your artsy side

This haiku is done

M. Griffin

I’ll Always Love Haiku

Say yes if you’ll stay

Please don’t say no I will cry

But I’ll be ok

T. Fluellen

Kara’s haiku challenge

Yes, I needed more stressors

Is this five syll-a-

B. Jones

Don’t forget haiku

You can enter more than one

Just have to be yours

K. Slayton

“Writing a haiku

Is not really hard,” she said.

But again, I fail.

Jolie

Another for you

You’ll say, “Keith, what did you do?”

A rhyming haiku!

K. Slayton

Nature

Is sunny today

Will be gloomy tomorrow

Spring is such a lie

R. Sunbury

Is spring really here?

It has gotten so cold now.

Spring is hard to find.

R. Reed-Curl

Winter Cold Haiku

Jump in, it’s not cold

Trust me, I have tested it!

Oh, wait it is cold.

T. Fluellen

Haiku to a Grape

Patience luscious grape

Harvest long past, chance we meet

Your stem now crystal

K. Halvin

I don’t know for sure

But I think Mother Nature

Is out to get us.

J. Tarwater

Spring has sprung again

Daffodil, dandelion

Yellow and spring green

D. Seufert

Raisins….loser grapes

Wine consists of winner grapes

Cheers to the winner

T. Bieck

Shoveling Snow

Newly discovered!

Easier to shovel snow

Before it’s trampled.

S. Shepherd

Torrential downpour

Baptized Carolina hills

Gleam green, emerge new

T. Decker

Cold green wind and light

April opens with vengeance

An assault on death

T. Decker

COVID

Haiku for COVID

I remove the mask.

After two years, see my smile.

Forgot my dentures.

P. Moore

Self-Isolation Haiku

How bored am I now?

Just went and did some yard work.

This s—‘s getting real.

R. Sunbury

A Haiku contest?

My home is my office now.

Pandemic present!

M. Murrock, ACCESS FCU

Due to pandemic,

I feel I have forever

Been working from home.

K. Lacey

I don’t miss the plague.

But I miss my short commute

From bedroom to chair.

Jolie

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | April 27, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Special Edition

Dear Editor’s Corner readers,

Today is a special day to me. It is the 10th anniversary of the Editor’s Corner. The blog started out as an email that I’d send to the technical writers in our department, trying to provide them helpful hints on writing. It slowly expanded, and with the help of my former manager, Shawn Albert Shepard, we created a blog.

I used to write daily articles and was soon joined by my fellow editors: Donna Bradley Burcher, Jackie Solano, and for a time my current manager, Ben Ritter. Now it is just me and Donna, and we only contact you twice a week. It is still our goal to keep you informed about writing, English, new words and old. We aim to keep it entertaining so you don’t associate proper punctuation and word usage with grammar nightmares.

I just want to thank all of you for your input, reading, and responses over the years. This remains one of my favorite parts of the job.

Regarding the haiku contest, well, we have some other things to celebrate. I received over 100 haiku—funny, sad, contemplative, angry, hilarious, and some not fit for print (at work, anyway). Some of the best were in the last category, so I added another prize for the submitter who made me spit out my water.

Here are the winners and their prizes (the first two won randomly from a spinning wheel of names).

  • Jolie (A friend of a coworker) – The Disheveled Dictionary
  • Keith Slayton (So many entries, most of them publishable) – He Smokes Like a Fish and Other Malaphors
  • Kristin Halvin (You know what you did) – Comma Sutra: Position Yourself for Success with Good Grammar

Over the next month, I will share the haiku submissions with you. Well done, everyone!

Courtesy of Joe Warren

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | April 26, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Forest Bathing

Today I received an email containing the term forest bathing. My first thought was of people running naked through Douglas Fir, Redwood, Madronas, and other forest trees in Washington state. Why naked? Because they’re bathing!

My next thought was, “How could I have never heard of this? I grew up in the Pacific Northwest, where there was a lot of “New Age” history, beliefs, and crystal-loving, so forest bathing seems to fit in with the New Age philosophies. One of my stepmom’s friends even built a yurt, where she does counseling in a down-to-earth and one-with-earth atmosphere. A yurt is a circular tent of felt or skins on a collapsible framework, used by nomads in Mongolia, Siberia, and Turkey. [KC – And the Pacific Northwest.]

So, what is forest bathing? The short answer is: it is the “practice of being in nature, especially an area with trees, as an act of sensory immersion undertaken for physiological and psychological health benefits.”

Okay. I personally love being out in nature because it is beautiful, relaxing, peaceful, invigorating, etc. But I’d never heard of this. Well, forest bathing is a thing! Kaiser Permanente, a huge hospital group in the United States, has a Facebook® page and articles about how forest bathing can improve your health. National Geographic posted an article with its top five places to forest bathe (which I couldn’t get to without subscribing). TIME magazine posted an article by a Chinese man, Qing Li, who is the world’s foremost expert in forest medicine and a big promoter of forest bathing.

Here are some details about it from the National Geographic article:

Whether you call it a fitness trend or a mindfulness practice (or a bit of both), what exactly is forest bathing? The term emerged in Japan in the 1980s as a physiological and psychological exercise called shinrin-yoku (“forest bathing” or “taking in the forest atmosphere”). The purpose was twofold: to offer an eco-antidote to tech-boom burnout and to inspire residents to reconnect with and protect the country’s forests.

The Japanese quickly embraced this form of ecotherapy. In the 1990s, researchers began studying the physiological benefits of forest bathing, providing the science to support what we innately know: time spent immersed in nature is good for us. While Japan is credited with the term shinrin-yoku, the concept at the heart of the practice is not new. Many cultures have long recognized the importance of the natural world to human health.

And from Qing Li’s TIME article mentioned above:

The key to unlocking the power of the forest is in the five senses. Let nature enter through your ears, eyes, nose, mouth, hands and feet. Listen to the birds singing and the breeze rustling in the leaves of the trees. Look at the different greens of the trees and the sunlight filtering through the branches. Smell the fragrance of the forest and breathe in the natural aromatherapy of phytoncides. Taste the freshness of the air as you take deep breaths. Place your hands on the trunk of a tree. Dip your fingers or toes in a stream. Lie on the ground. Drink in the flavor of the forest and release your sense of joy and calm. This is your sixth sense, a state of mind. Now you have connected with nature. You have crossed the bridge to happiness.

Whether you decide to try it or not, now you know what it is! My only recommendation is that you don’t bathe in a forest full of bears, at least not with a snack in your pocket!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | April 21, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Thursday Quiz Day!

Good morning!

A lot of you keep telling me you like quizzes—so I’m afraid the rest of you have to suffer. Well, maybe not so much. This is a different kind of quiz than I usually pop on you. This one isn’t about language rules. This one is a test of your knowledge of English-language idioms. I found the quiz on Dictionary.com. They say, “It’s not for the faint of heart.” Get it? Those dictionary.com folks are so punny!

You’ve taken these quizzes before. You know the score. Just take the test, note your answers, and then scroll down to see how many you got right. Remember, I did not create the quiz, so any arguments, complaints, or general dissatisfaction will be summarily dismissed because, as my granny used to say, “It ain’t got nothin’ to do with me.”

1. What does “apple of one’s eye” mean?

  • Something is stuck in your eye
  • Someone has green eyes
  • Someone who is very special

2. Which of the following expressions means to get married?

  • To tie the knot
  • To make hay
  • To sit on the fence

3. Choose the sentence that uses “puppy love” correctly.

  • We fell in PUPPY LOVE immediately.
  • It’s only PUPPY LOVE; it won’t last.
  • The dogs PUPPY LOVED one another.

4. True or false? The expression “ride or die” is a reference to Bonnie and Clyde.

  • True
  • False

5. What does “match made in heaven” mean?

  • A couple has died at the same time
  • A couple is perfectly suited to one another
  • A couple is very virtuous

6. Which of the following expressions means to be nervous?

  • To have butterflies in one’s stomach
  • To put all your eggs in one basket
  • To cut someone some slack

7. True or false? “Lovebirds” does not refer to a specific kind of bird.

  • True
  • False

8. What does “to carry a torch for” mean?

  • To lead the way
  • To still love someone after a relationship ends
  • To fall in love with someone

Answers:

  1. What does “apple of one’s eye” mean?
  • Someone who is very special
  1. Which of the following expressions means to get married?
  • To tie the knot
  1. Choose the sentence that uses “puppy love” correctly.
  • It’s only PUPPY LOVE; it won’t last
  1. True or false? The expression “ride or die” is a reference to Bonnie and Clyde.
  • True
  1. What does “match made in heaven” mean?
  • A couple is perfectly suited to one another
  1. Which of the following expressions means to be nervous?
  • To have butterflies in one’s stomach
  1. True or false? “Lovebirds” does not refer to a specific kind of bird.
  • False
  1. What does “to carry a torch for” mean?
  • To still love someone after a relationship ends

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Older Posts »

Categories