Posted by: Jack Henry | October 4, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Part 2 of Idioms from Readers

Hey! You’re the next contestant on “What’s That Idiom?” I have three from the crowd out there today:

  • How the tides have turned
  • Mind out of the gutter
  • The whole nine yards

How the tides have turned

An idiom that means that someone’s luck has changed completely. It could be a change in either direction—from good to bad, or vice versa.

Examples:

  • Bob used to be the luckiest guy at the local casino, but oh, how the tides have turned! He now loses money on every game he plays, even for nickels.
  • The tides had definitely turned for Mishka. She stared life in America as an orphaned immigrant, and thirty years later she’d grown her business to a $5 billion-dollar enterprise.

Get your mind out of the gutter

(slang) To stop having and giving voice to lewd, inappropriate thoughts

I couldn’t find a definitive reference, but some blogs say that this idiom has been around since the days where waste was disposed of in the filthy, dirty gutters. (Yay for underground plumbing!) That makes sense considering the people whose minds are “in the gutter,” are being accused of thinking filthy thoughts of a different biological nature—being naughty and Rated X.

The whole nine yards

Richard Sunbury taunted me with this phrase and told me it was sure to send me down a rabbit hole. Sure enough, he was correct. There are many suggestions about where it’s from, but nothing has been set in stone. Wikipedia summed up a lot of what I found in bits and pieces elsewhere. I’ve edited it for space.

"The whole nine yards" or "the full nine yards" is a colloquial American English phrase meaning "everything, the whole lot" or, when used as an adjective, "all the way."

The earliest known idiomatic use of the phrase is from 1907 in Southern Indiana. The phrase is related to the expression the whole six yards, used around the same time in Kentucky and South Carolina. Both phrases are variations on the whole ball of wax, first recorded in the 1880s. They are part of a family of expressions in which an odd-sounding item, such as enchilada, shooting match, shebang or hog, is substituted for ball of wax. The choice of the number nine may be related to the expression "To the nines" (to perfection).

There is still no consensus on the origin, though many early published quotations are now available for study. A vast number of explanations for this phrase have been suggested; however, many of these are no longer viable in light of what is now known about the phrase’s history.

· Many of the popular candidates relate to the length of pieces of fabric, or various garments, including Indian saris, Scottish kilts, burial shrouds, or bolts of cloth. No single source verifies that any one of those suggestions was the actual origin. However, an article published in Comments on Etymology demonstrates that fabric was routinely sold in standard lengths of nine yards (and other multiples of three yards) during the 1800s and early 1900s.

· One explanation is that World War II (1939–1945) aircraft machine gun belts were nine yards long. There are many versions of this explanation with variations regarding type of plane, nationality of gunner and geographic area. An alternative weapon is the ammunition belt for the British Vickers machine gun, invented and adopted by the British Army before World War I (1914–1918). The standard belt for this gun held 250 rounds of ammunition and was approximately twenty feet (6⅔ yards) in length. However, the Vickers gun as fitted to aircraft during the First World War usually had ammunition containers capable of accommodating linked belts of 350-400 rounds, the average length of such a belt being about nine yards, and it was thought that this may be the origin of the phrase. This theory is no longer considered viable, since the phrase predates World War I.

· Another common explanation is that "nine yards" is a cubic measure and refers to the volume of a concrete mixer. This theory, too, is inconsistent with the phrase’s history.

· Other proposed sources include the volume of graves; ritual disembowelment; shipyards; and American football. Little documentary evidence has surfaced to support any of these explanations.

There you have it! Three more idiomatic phrases with a little history and various theories of their origins, and I gave you the whole six yards!

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

Pronouns: she/her | Call via Teams | jackhenry.com

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: Jack Henry | September 29, 2022

Editor’s Corner: More Idioms

Dear Editrix:

I want to put you on the spot. You need to be spot on.

What is this spot? Where did this spot originate? When you are put on the spot, is it the same spot that you are spot on?

I hope that you can spot an answer.

ؘ– RF

Dear Ron,

A month or so ago, you were full of questions involving idioms about shortness and cutting; this month it’s spots. I’m beginning to worry about you a bit. But last time you wrote, you inspired others to throw more idioms my way, so let’s cover them over a couple of days. Here’s our line-up for today:

  • On the spot
  • Spot-on
  • Gung ho
  • How come

on the spot: without any delay; immediately.

Example: He went to the garage sale, fell in love with a used bicycle, and bought it on the spot. That’s all fine and dandy for the basic idiomatic meaning, but when I looked for more I found this, from The Hindu webpage:

In the old days, pirates used to send the ace of spades which had a spot in the middle to people they intended to kill. Anyone who received this card knew he had been ‘put on the spot’ — he was slated to die. Even today, the ace of spades is seen as a symbol of death in many countries.

I can’t vouch for this, but I sure like the story!

spot on: (Chiefly British) Exactly correct.

Example: De’Nora brought a handbag to go with my new, blingy outfit and her choice was spot on–they worked perfectly together!

gung-ho: unthinkingly enthusiastic and eager, especially about taking part in fighting or warfare.

Example: Mo was so gung-ho about his new job, he bought a new pair of pants for each day of the week and company shirts in every color of the rainbow.

Here is the beginning of the article from Wikipedia:

Gung ho is an English term, with the current meaning of "overly enthusiastic or energetic". It originated during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) from a Chinese term, (pinyin: gōnghé; lit. ‘to work together’), short for Chinese Industrial Cooperatives (Chinese: 工業合作社; pinyin: Gōngyè Hézuòshè).

The linguist Albert Moe concluded that the term is an "Americanism that is derived from the Chinese, but its several accepted American meanings have no resemblance whatsoever to the recognized meaning in the original language" and that its "various linguistic uses, as they have developed in the United States, have been peculiar to American speech." In Chinese, concludes Moe, "this is neither a slogan nor a battle cry; it is only a name for an organization.

How come: (slang, informal, grammatically incorrect) The Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary says “how come” is “used to ask why something has happened or is true.” It is a short form of “how did it come about that…” The dictionary also says the expression is usually found in the United States and is used in casual speech. (KC – I always think of it as a wordy way to ask “Why?”)

Example: How come you and Jo-Jo never had kids?

Those are your answers for today. Until next time, when I have a few more idioms and explanations for you.

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

Pronouns: she/her | Call via Teams | jackhenry.com

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: Jack Henry | September 27, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Virgin

Dear Editrix,

Here’s a word that bothers me: virgin. Why do we use that term, such as virgin drinks, virgin ground, etc.?

Sincerely,

Why?

Dear Why,

My first inclination is to refer to Madonna, who sums it up as “touched for the very first time.” That would apply to something like “virgin ground” or the original meaning of the word. As far as alcohol, though, the term “virgin drink” has a history, dating back to Prohibition. From The Zero Proof:

According to many sources, the name dates back to the prohibition era.

Around this time, the Bloody Mary, which combines vodka with tomato juice, became a popular cocktail. During Prohibition, though, folks could no longer go out and order a Bloody Mary to drink. Instead, they would ask for a Virgin Mary, which was just plain old tomato juice.

Referring to the drink as a Virgin Mary was a tongue-in-cheek way of clarifying that the customer wasn’t ordering alcohol. It also had obvious goody two shoes, church-related overtones that made folks smile (especially when they would go on to add their own vodka later from a personal pocket or hip flask).

You may also hear people refer to non-alcoholic drinks as “zero proof” drinks, “Temperance” drinks, or “mocktails” (a portmanteau of “mock cocktails”). These terms are also from the early 1920s.

I read several articles that chastise the term “mocktail” for the following reasons (this from the Atlantic Eater):

The term mocktail…can summon feelings of being patronized or infantilized; as if the person ordering is already being judged for choosing not to drink alcohol. Is the person skipping alcohol because of calories? A pregnancy? They need to drive home? Perhaps they have a problem with alcohol or addiction. A person should be able to order non-alcoholic drinks without feeling ashamed.

Who would think non-alcoholic drinks would be fraught with so much tension? Whatever you choose to call it, I hope it tastes good!

kara church | technical editor, advisory | technical publications

pronouns: she/her | call via teams | jackhenry.com

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Posted by: Jack Henry | September 22, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Thank you!

Good morning! And thanks for joining me today.

This morning, I’m diving into how we thank each other and also how we respond when we are thanked. Because my spouse is from England, I’ve had the pleasure of traveling to the UK throughout most of my adult life, and years ago I briefly lived in the south of England. I noticed right away that the Brits are very polite: they rarely neglect to say please and thank you. Here in the U.S., we may imply a “please” with a friendly tone of voice, such as, “Would you mind handing me the salt?” Don’t try that with my spouse. He’ll stare you down with an angelic smile on his face until you say the word…please. Yep, good manners by friendly intimidation.

What I noticed very quickly during my first visits to the UK is that the Brits didn’t (and mostly still don’t) say “you’re welcome.” Instead, they tended to nod. And you may have noticed that saying “you’re welcome” here in the U.S. is becoming less customary—at least the way we say it is changing. These days, you’re more likely to hear something like “no problem,” “sure thing,” or “you bet.” My son says, “Of course!”

Well, Grammar Girl recently wrote a post on this very topic and explained that saying “you’re welcome” is a fairly new practice in the English language. And it’s not that common in English dialects outside of the U.S. It is more common, apparently, in other languages such as Swedish, Russian, and German.

This begs the question, why doesn’t the exchange end after the words “thank you” are spoken? Someone does someone else a favor; the person receiving the favor acknowledges with thanks. The exchange is over, isn’t it? Not in the U.S.

Grammar Girl pointed out, and I’ve noticed this too, that some people get a little touchy when they say thank you and get a response like “no problem.” They find it rude because they assume it suggests they were a problem to begin with. But she points out that we really should be thinking of all of these “pleasantries” as formulaic expressions that are designed to perform a social task. She says that these expressions “…no longer carry literal meaning…In fact, younger people have been known to view ‘you’re welcome’ as pompous because they see it as emphasizing or pointing out that ‘Yes, indeed, I did do you a favor.’”

It seems to me that some people may just be looking for a reason to be upset. Maybe we should all be happy with a good intention, a friendly tone of voice, and a smile (and perfect grammar—just kidding!).

Please enjoy the rest of your day. Thank you!

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | jack henry™

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Posted by: Jack Henry | September 20, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Baking with Brits

Good morning, folks! I hope this finds you all in good cheer.

Today’s topic is vocabulary. More specifically, it is vocabulary from The Great British Baking Show, which has just returned to Netflix®. I was watching the other evening to see what amazing things people can do with flour, and I jotted down a handful of words that I was not very familiar with. You may ask, “Don’t they speak English in England?” Well, yes, they do, but there are Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, and people from former British colonies in the contest, and they have many terms that aren’t the same as American English. Here are a few things you might hear:

  • stodgy (adjective)

1a: having a thick gluey consistency

b: having a thick texture: heavy—used especially of food

Every now and then, the hosts will describe a cake as “stodgy,” when the contestants serve up a layered sponge cake that hasn’t risen very well.

  • bap (noun)

chiefly Scottish

: a small loaf or roll of bread

In this case, the hosts were talking about a “crusty bap,” but it was cake week, so I don’t think that was a compliment.

  • claggy (adjective)

1 dialectal : sticky, gummy

Again, this comment is usually delivered with the judges scrunching up their faces and returning most of their forkful of cake to the plate. Just saying the word “claggy” sticks in your throat—give it a try.

  • chuffed (adjective)

British

: quite pleased : delighted

I love this word. I must admit, I heard it much more in the Junior Bake Off, when the kids said they were “so chuffed to be (there)” making some delicious-looking desserts.

  • pebble dash (noun)

: a mixture (as of mortar) prepared to be dashed against a moist surface to make a finishing coat (KC – in this case, pebbles).

I know, that doesn’t sound very delicious. It is a “finish” for houses (I got the impression it was for less expensive homes in Britain), but it is also a technique for cakes. Here is the mortar and pebble siding for a home (the pebbles are just thrown into the mortar):

And here is a pebble-dashed cake (in this case, with Post Fruity Pebbles™):

If you’re looking for some entertainment, nice looking (usually) baked goods, and some new vocabulary, I definitely recommend this show.

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

Pronouns: she/her | (619) 542-6773 | jackhenry.com

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: Jack Henry | September 15, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Saturday

For as many depressing songs as Monday has, Saturday is a happening day that a lot of us can’t wait for! Here are just a few songs about that day of the week.

  • Saturday, in the Park
  • Saturday Night’s Alright
  • Saturday Sun
  • Almost Saturday
  • Saturday Night Special
  • Saturday Love
  • Saturday Night at the Movies

To finish up our series, let’s see what Dictionary.com has to say about Saturday:

The first records of the word Saturday come from before 900. It comes from the Middle English Saturdai, from the Old English Saternesdæg, which is a partial translation of the Latin Sāturnī diēs, meaning “Saturn’s day.”

The ancient Romans named the day we call Saturday after the planet Saturn, which was named for their god of agriculture. This naming system was based on the one credited to the ancient Babylonians, who are thought to be the first to use a seven-day week and who named each of the seven days after planets and other celestial bodies.

In U.S. history, the Saturday Night Massacre is a name for the events of October 20, 1973, during which senior government officials resigned to protest actions by President Richard Nixon related to the Watergate scandal.

In pop culture, Saturday Night Live is a long-running sketch comedy show that’s broadcast live on Saturday night.

In English, we still stick with Saturn’s day, while the other romance languages and Greek, return to the newer, religious definition: Saturday is the sabbath, a day of religious observance and abstinence from work. Jewish people recognize the sabbath (Shabbat) from Friday evening to Saturday evening. Most Christians recognize their day of rest on Sunday.

English Greek Spanish French Italian Romanian Portuguese
Sunday Κυριακή

Kyriakí

Domingo Dimanche Domenica Duminică Domingo
Monday Δευτέρα

Deftéra

Lunes Lundi Lunedi Luni Segunda-Feira
Tuesday Τρίτη

Tríti

Martes Mardi Martedì Marţi Terça-Feira
Wednesday
Τετάρτη
Tetárti
Miércoles Mercredi Mercoledì Miercuri Quarta-Feira
Thursday
Πέμπτη
Pémpti
Jueves Jeudi Giovedì Joi Quinta-Feira
Friday
Παρασκευή
Paraskeví
Viernes Vendredit Venerdì Vineri Sexta-Feira
Saturday
Σάββατο
Sávvato
Sábado Samedi Sabato Sâmbătă Sábado

Now it is time for our day of rest, after covering English and the days of the week. I’m sure there are so many other stories out there, depending on different religions, history, and languages. I hope you’ve learned something new…I know I have!

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

Pronouns: she/her | (619) 542-6773 | jackhenry.com

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: Jack Henry | September 13, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Looking forward to Friday!

I have a particular fondness for the word Friday. I’m sure we all like it because it usually means the weekend is ahead. But I also like it because it reminds me of my niece, Freya. You’ll see why in just a minute. From Dictionary.com:

The first records of the word Friday come from before 1000. It comes from the Old English Frīgedæg, meaning “Freya‘s day.” In Latin, the name for the day we call Friday is dies Veneris, meaning “Venus’s day,” referring to the Roman goddess of love. However, the name of the day in many languages is instead based on the name of one of two goddesses from Norse mythology, either the love goddess Freya or chief goddess Frigg (or Frigga), wife of Odin.

In Islam, Friday is a day of worship.

In Christianity, Good Friday is the Friday before Easter that marks the death of Jesus.

In U.S. history, Black Friday refers to September 24, 1869, the date of a financial panic sparked by gold speculators. The term Black Friday is more commonly known as the informal name for the day after Thanksgiving, on which retailers offer special sales to mark the start of the holiday shopping season.

The date Friday the 13th is popularly associated with superstitions about bad luck or evil occurrences.

I’m returning to the original table I made for this, because there is one language that makes a change on their meaning for this day. While English and the Romance languages (minus Portuguese) named Friday after the goddess of love in their cultures, the Greek name has made a change. As I mentioned before, while the Ancient Greeks followed the days named after the sun, moon, and gods, the modern Greeks changed the names to God’s Day, and then “second,” “third,” etc. Once they get to Friday, they name it Παρασκευή (Paraskeví), which means “preparation.” Specifically, it means preparation for the Sabbath. Once again, we return to the religious naming of the days (like Sunday, in all of the languages we’ve looked at, except English).

Now, it’s time for us to prepare for the Sabbath: our last day of the seven!

English Greek Spanish French Italian Romanian Portuguese
Sunday Κυριακή

Kyriakí

Domingo Dimanche Domenica Duminică Domingo
Monday Δευτέρα

Deftéra

Lunes Lundi Lunedi Luni Segunda-Feira
Tuesday Τρίτη

Tríti

Martes Mardi Martedì Marţi Terça-Feira
Wednesday Τετάρτη

Tetárti

Miércoles Mercredi Mercoledì Miercuri Quarta-Feira
Thursday Πέμπτη

Pémpti

Jueves Jeudi Giovedì Joi Quinta-Feira
Friday
Παρασκευή
Paraskeví
Viernes Vendredit Venerdì Vineri Sexta-Feira
Saturday
Σάββατο
Sávvato
Sábado Samedi Sabato Sâmbătă Sábado

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

Pronouns: she/her | (619) 542-6773 | jackhenry.com

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Posted by: Jack Henry | September 8, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Sneaking Suspicion

I was recently sending an email to a friend and colleague, and I wrote that I had a “sneaky suspicion.” As soon as I typed the words, I had a sneaking suspicion that I got the idiom wrong. And I was right about being wrong, so I fixed it before I sent it. My friend still doesn’t know that I’m not perfect! Whew!

A few months ago, I wrote a post called Commonly Confused Idioms, and “sneaking suspicion” wasn’t on that list, so I thought that I’d provide a few more idioms that give people pause. Here you go.

Incorrect Correct
Another thing coming Another think coming

Explanation: This is simply a misheard expression. The entire original phrase was “If that’s what you think, then you’ve got another think coming.” I would argue that “another thing” is much more common these days, but it’s good to know the original idiom.

Incorrect Correct
Beckon call Beck and call

Explanation: This mistake makes sense because beckon means to call over or request. But a beck is a nod, or wave, or other signal that is used to summon or command.

Incorrect Correct
Case and point Case in point

Explanation: This one is a little murkier, as idioms often are. It seems like you could make your case and your point, but actually, your case is in your point.

Incorrect Correct
Extract revenge Exact revenge

Explanation: Extract means to remove. Exacting is another word for getting. This idiom is talking about getting revenge.

Incorrect Correct
First come, first serve First come, first served

Explanation: If you say “first come, first serve” you are implying that the first one who comes has to serve everyone who comes after. Actually, the first one who comes is served first.

Incorrect Correct
Shoe in Shoo in

Explanation: I think this mistake happens because people aren’t familiar with the word shoo, which means to urge something along (think of the phrase “shoo fly”). According to Merriam-Webster, “the meaning of shoo-in comes from an earlier use of the verb shoo, which generally means ‘to scare, drive, or send (someone or something) away.’ At the turn of the 20th century, the verb shoo, followed by in, came to be used in horse racing to mean ‘to allow a racehorse to win easily.’”

Incorrect Correct
Step foot in Set foot in

Explanation: This is another misheard expression. Sure, step foot in makes sense, but I’d argue that set foot in makes more sense.

Incorrect Correct
Without further adieu Without further ado

Explanation: Adieu is a French word that means goodbye. This expression isn’t about leaving; it’s about getting on with it. Ado means “fussy excitement.” We don’t want any of that nonsense!

Happy Thursday all!

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | jack henry™

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Posted by: Jack Henry | September 6, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Short Shrift

I’m guessing that most of you have heard the term “short shrift” before (meaning unsympathetic dismissal or curt treatment), but this term has an interesting history and some related words that may be of interest to you. We’ll start with some definitions and then the historical significance.

short shrift (noun)

1: a brief respite from death

2a: summary treatment: little consideration

b: quick work

shrive (transitive verb)

shrived or shrove; shriven

or shrived; shriving; shrives

1: to hear the confession of, impose penance on, and give absolution to (a person) in the sacrament of penance <the resident parson … would sing his daily Mass and come in to shrive the sick — G. G. Coulton>

2: to free from guilt: pardon, purge <shrives his burdened mind — Robert Trumbull>

shrive (intransitive verb)

1 archaic: to hear confessions, to impose penance, and to give absolution in performance of the ecclesiastical office of confessor

2: to confess one’s sins especially to a priest

And now, for a little background on “short shrift” from Phrases.org:

Shrift? Not a word you hear every day. In fact, apart from in this expression, it is now so rarely used that it’s hard to think of a shrift that isn’t short.

The verb shrive is also now an almost forgotten antique. A priest in a confession, often when the confessor was near to death, would shrive them by imposing a penance, called a shrift, in order to provide absolution.

Shrove Tuesday, which most of us in the UK now refer to as Pancake Day, derives from shriving – originally a day when people were shriven or shrove; more recently a day when we toss pancakes.

In the 17th century, criminals were sent to the scaffold immediately after sentencing and only had time for a cursory “short shrift” before being hanged. From that literal beginning “short shrift” migrated into meaning “give cursory consideration to.”

The term “short shrift” is ancient and has been part of the English language since at least the 16th century.

The first known use of “short shrift” in print relates to the history of the British monarchy. Following the death of Edward IV in 1483, the Duke of Gloucester was appointed Lord Protector of England. He accused Lord Hastings of plotting against him and arranged for him to be executed. Hastings was allowed only a short shrift as Gloucester was anxious to get his dinner.

An account of this story was printed almost a hundred years later in by the English writer Raphael Holinshed in The Chronicles of England, 1577. (KC – See the article for the rest of the story.)

Shakespeare had undoubtedly read the Chronicles before he wrote Richard III, first performed in 1594, as his account of the events differ little from Holinshed’s:

GLOUCESTER
Off with his head! Now, by Saint Paul I swear,
I will not dine until I see the same.

RATCLIFF:
Dispatch, my lord [Hastings]; the duke would be at dinner:
Make a short shrift; he longs to see your head.

Nowadays, if you hear this phrase to mean “little consideration,” it seems like it is used quite casually. Who knew it had such a grim and lengthy history behind it?

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

Pronouns: she/her | (619) 542-6773 | jackhenry.com

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: Jack Henry | September 1, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Thor’s Day!

Hello, and happy day of Thor!

We Americans like Thor. I wonder why?

As with Tuesday and Wednesday, English has strayed from the Romance languages with our name for Thursday, too. According to Dictionary.com:

The first records of Thursday come from before 950. It comes from the Old English Thursdæg, from Old Danish Thūrsdagr, meaning “Thor‘s day.” This is a translation of (or is modeled on) the Latin term diēs Jovis, meaning “Jupiter’s day.” In many Germanic languages, the Roman god Jupiter was subbed out in favor of Thor, the hammer-wielding god of thunder in Norse mythology.

In Christianity, Holy Thursday is the Thursday before Easter, marking the day on which the Last Supper is believed to have taken place.

In the U.S., the only national holiday to fall exclusively on a Thursday is Thanksgiving, which is observed on the fourth Thursday of November.

So, we have named our day after Thor, a hammer-wielding god associated with lightning, thunder, storms, sacred groves and trees, strength, the protection of mankind, hallowing, and fertility, according to Wikipedia. Similarly, the Romans, Spanish, French, Italian, and Romanians have named their Thursday after Jupiter, by Jove, the god of thunder, lighting, and the sky. Same god, same day, different names.

I hope you have a great day without too much hammer-wielding and thunder!

Thor, in battle

English Ancient Greek Roman Spanish French Italian Romanian
Sunday Day of the sun

(hemera helio)

Day of the sun

(dies Solis)

Domingo Dimanche Domenica Duminică
Monday Day of the moon

(hemera selenes)

Day of the moon

(dies Lunae)

Lunes Lundi Lunedi Luni
Tuesday Ares, war god Martis, war god Martes Mardi Martedì Marţi
Wednesday Hermes, messenger god Mercurii, messenger god Miércoles Mercredi Mercoledì Miercuri
Thursday Zeus, god of sky/thunder Jovis (Jove/Jupiter), sky and thunder god Jueves Jeudi Giovedì Joi
Friday Aphrodite, love goddess Veneris (Venus), love goddess Viernes Vendredit Venerdì Vineri
Saturday
Kronos, time god
Saturn, father of Jupiter Sábado Samedi Sabato Sâmbătă

Kara Church | Technical Editor, Advisory | Technical Publications

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