Posted by: episystechpubs | November 15, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Smothered Verbs Quiz

Many of you have told me that you enjoy an occasional quiz, so for you sadists, happy quiz day! I found this quiz on Daily Writing Tips. It’s a good one to help us avoid unnecessary words that clutter our writing. This quiz will help you identify and revise “smothered verbs.”

But first, what is a smothered verb? It’s a verb-noun combination (often also including an article or preposition) that can easily be replaced by a simple verb. The noun in this combination is often a word that ends in –tion, –sion, –ment, –ance, or –ence. An example of smothering a verb is to write “have a discussion” rather than “discuss.”

  • Your manager wants to have a discussion about your goals for this year.
  • Your manager wants to discuss your goals for this year.

In the previous example, one word replaced four. Here’s another example of a smothered verb followed by an uncluttered revision:

  • How many clients do you expect to be in attendance?
  • How many clients do you expect to attend?

Got it? OK. Now that you know what a smothered verb is, are you ready for the quiz? The quiz questions are below. Scroll down to see the answers. Good luck, amigos!

Each of the following sentences includes a smothered verb. Revise the sentences as necessary for conciseness:

  1. The committee will hold a meeting this Wednesday evening at seven o’clock.
  1. I will make a decision after studying the criteria you have given me.
  1. We hope someone can provide an answer to this political question.
  1. A school counselor’s job is to give advice to the students.

5. Please take into consideration the suggestion your father made.

Answers and Explanations

In order to improve sentences containing smothered verbs you simply need to replace them with the original verbs.
Example: Her guardian has made provision for her in his will.
You should replace “has made provision” with “provided.”

1.
Original: The committee will hold a meeting this Wednesday evening at seven o’clock.
Correct: The committee will meet this Wednesday evening at seven o’clock.

2.
Original: I will make a decision after studying the criteria you have given me.
Correct: I will decide after studying the criteria you have given me.

3.
Original: We hope someone can provide an answer to this political question.
Correct: We hope someone can answer this political question.

4.
Original: A school counselor’s job is to give advice to the students.
Correct: A school counselor’s job is to advise the students.

5.
Original: Please take into consideration the suggestion your father made.
Correct: Please consider the suggestion your father made.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

Symitar Documentation Services

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Posted by: episystechpubs | November 13, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Belated Veterans Day

Hello, everyone!

Since we’re only writing Editor’s Corner twice a week, I’m a little late with this one. My apologies! We observed Veterans Day yesterday, but I wanted to acknowledge and thank our veterans in a different way today, by looking at some of the words we use in English that come from the world of warfare. This is only a partial list, but if you’d like to see more, go to Daily Writing Tips.

army: from medieval Latin armata (“army”)—also the source of the Spanish term armada, meaning “war fleet”—referring to a nation’s entire body of land forces or to one major unit of that body

brigade: from Italian briga (“quarrel”), a word for a unit consisting of thousands of soldiers or, by extension, to any large group of people organized according to common belief or toward achievement of a common goal; brigadier is a military rank for someone in command of a brigade, and related words are brigand (originally meaning “soldier” but later denoting a bandit) and brig and brigantine for types of warships during the Age of Sail (the use of the former as prison ships led to brig being applied to military prisons)

corps: from Latin corpus (“body”), a set unit of tens of thousands of soldiers; by extension, also a more or less numerous group of people involved in the same activity, such as the press corps or a corps de ballet, or ballet company

fleet: from Old English fleotan (“float”), a set unit of military naval vessels or the entirety of such vessels belonging to a navy or to a company; by extension, now also applied to collections of vehicles, such as a group of cars owned by a company or a government agency and available for employees’ use

legion: from Latin legere (“gather”), originally a Roman military unit equivalent to a modern brigade; now, vaguely describes a multitude

platoon: from French pelaton (“little ball”), originally referring only to a set unit of about several dozen soldiers and by extension coming to mean a squad of athletes with a common function (such as offensive and defensive teams in football) or any group of people with a common characteristic or goal

regiment: ultimately from Latin regere (“lead straight” or “rule”), regimen was adopted into English to refer primarily to a fitness or health plan, but its cognate regiment refers to a military unit of about a thousand or more soldiers; to regiment is to control strictly

squad: ultimately from Vulgar Latin [KC – Ooh, I love me some vulgar Latin!] exquadrare (“make square”) by way of Middle French esquade, initially denoting a set unit of about a dozen soldiers but later also referring in general to a small group engaged in an activity (see also squadron)

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 8, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Appraise or Apprise

Apprise means, “give notice to” or “tell.” It usually implies communicating something of special interest or importance, as in the following examples:

  • They apprised him of his rights.
  • Keep us apprised of the situation.

Appraise means, “set a value on” or “estimate the amount of.” It often refers to judging the monetary worth of a thing (as in the first example below), but it may be used of any critical judgment (as in the second example).

  • They are having their house appraised.
  • The critics appraised the actor’s career.

Some people mistakenly say appraise when they mean apprise. To avoid this mistake, remember that appraise sounds like (and is etymologically related to) the word praise. After you appraise something, you might praise it.

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Ben Ritter | Technical Editor | Symitar®
8985 Balboa Avenue | San Diego, CA 92123
619-682-3391 | or ext. 763391 | www.Symitar.com

Symitar Documentation Services

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Posted by: episystechpubs | November 6, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Inquire vs. Enquire

Recently, one of you asked me about the difference between the words inquire and enquire. My first thought was that they are two different spellings of the same word, one used by the U.S. (inquire) and the other by the U.K. (enquire), but looking a little further, I found that there’s a bit more to it than that.

From Daily Writing Tips:

These are two spellings of the same word, which means to seek information about something or to conduct a formal investigation (usually when followed by “into”). The corresponding noun is enquiry or inquiry.

Either spelling can be used, but many people prefer enquire and enquiry for the general sense of “ask,” and inquire and inquiry for a formal investigation:

[KC – I stepped in and changed the examples a bit.]

· Jane enquired about the handsome boy’s name.

· The most common student enquiry at the “Lost and Found” desk is “Did someone find a black umbrella?”

· Detective Morgan was sent to inquire into the incident.

· Nittle, Nattle, and Frattle, Attorneys at Law, finished the inquiry Friday and sent the results to the court the following Monday.

In practice, enquire and enquiry are more common in British English, and inquire and inquiry are more common in U.S. English, for both informal questions and formal investigations. However, the Guardian (a British newspaper) tells writers to “use inquiry” and the Oxford English Dictionary seems to recognize inquire as the more dominant form, deeming enquiry:

”An alternative form of INQUIRE. The modern dictionaries give inquire as the standard form, but enquire is still very frequently used, esp. in the sense ‘to ask a question’.”

That being said, I think in the U.S. you are probably safest using inquire or inquiry, unless you’re talking about the National Enquirer, in which case nothing is safe or sacred!

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 1, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Just, and Other Weak Words

Dear Editrix,

The word just seems like an overused worthless word. Every time I see it in a sentence, I remove it. I think someone told me once that it was an apologetic word used to gain sympathy. So, what kind of word is just?

Sincerely,
RK

Dear RK,
You’re right, just can be overused and worthless, depending on how it is being used. If it is being used as an adjective to mean what Merriam-Webster describes as “based on or behaving according to what is morally right and fair,” then that’s cool for cats.

Example: I don’t think the judge’s ruling was just; after all, I couldn’t help laughing at the police officer when she flew off her Segway into the fountain. [KC—Anybody who knows me and Segways knows that I am the police officer in this story.]

When just is being used as an adverb to mean “very recently,” that’s also okay.

Example: I just fell off a Segway ten minutes ago! [KC—No, Mom. I didn’t go on a Segway in Germany. I did not break my promise to you.]

It’s when you use just as an adverb to mean “exactly, precisely, totally, completely,” or something similar that it starts becoming weak, and makes your sentences weaker.

Examples:

When someone is writing or speaking, and they say:

  • “I just thought you should know…”
  • “It just irks me when…”
  • “I think you should just try a little harder…”

You can certainly get rid of just and make your sentence stronger. Try reading the bulleted phrases without just and listen to the stronger meaning.

RK asked what this type of word is called, and I found several articles on the word just, but none suggesting a particular word type. Then I found this article called Five Weak Words, which seems to fit the bill. The three that I thought were most important were really, very, and things/stuff. Of course, the store in my neighborhood called “Stuff n’ Thangs” would probably beg to differ.

For more on the five weak words to avoid, click here.

For El Dia de Los Muertos

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | October 30, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Scare Quotes

In the spirit of Halloween, I’d like to take the opportunity to share some spooky information about scare quotes (also known as sneer quotes, shudder quotes, and sometimes quibble marks). To be honest, scare quotes are not spooky, but as long as I have your interest, read on!

Scare quotes are a fairly recent phenomenon, and according to Merriam-Webster, they are intended to express skepticism. Since the advent of word processors, quotation marks around a single word or phrase are no longer used to provide emphasis. Now, they tell you to question or doubt the information.

So, a problem occurs when writers use quotation marks to provide emphasis. These days, readers are most likely to interpret the quotation marks as scare quotes. I’ll provide some examples to show you what I mean.

  • Our competitor claims to have made “significant profits” last fiscal year.

The quotation marks imply that there is some doubt about whether the competitor is actually profitable.

  • The restaurant always served “fresh” fish.

Adding quotation marks around the word fresh suggests that the fish is not fresh. You probably don’t want to order the fish at this restaurant.

  • Yesterday, I was chased by my neighbor’s “dog”: a poodle.

The quotation marks give the impression that poodles are not actually dogs. Balderdash! Of course they are! They didn’t ask for those haircuts.

These three examples are not intended to be sarcastic, but the quotation marks, which are being used to provide emphasis (albeit unnecessary) could easily be misinterpreted, leaving the reader with doubt and uncertainty (and maybe a chuckle).

To avoid being misunderstood, do not use quotation marks for emphasis. You can use them when you are directly quoting someone, or for the titles of chapters in a book and song titles, etc., or when your coining a new word or phrase. And of course, you can use them to be sarcastic or ironic. No quotation marks were necessary in my three examples because no emphasis was necessary.

What do you do if you want to emphasize a word or phrase? The JHA Style Guide tells us to use italics, but it warns to use them sparingly or they lose their significance.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
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together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | October 25, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Oh boy!

Good morning, my fellow word lovers!

The other day someone asked me, “Why do we say ‘Oh boy!’ as an exclamation or interjection to express shock or surprise?” I’m sure the people around me wish I said, “Oh boy,” instead of some of the other things I say when I’m surprised.

I started looking into this seemingly simple question, but you know that rabbit hole I’ve mentioned traveling down? Well the bunnies really taunted me this time! Today we’ll start with “boy,” and over the next few days, we’ll work our way to the other topics I found. This excerpt is from a longer article in Daily Writing Tips:

Boy has been in the language since 1300. More than one etymology has been argued, but its origin is uncertain. Its earliest use in English was with the meaning “male servant” or “slave.”

Note: Before boy came to mean “a male child,” the word girl was used to refer to young people of either sex. A speaker who wanted to refer to a “male ‘girl’” used the expression “knave girl.” Both words, boy and girl, had taken on their present meanings by the 1400s.

In the British colonies and in the American South, boy was used to refer to non-white servants, regardless of age. Today, of course, such usage is considered to be extremely offensive. In France, until fairly recently, the usual term for summoning a waiter was garçon, “boy,” but nowadays, serveur is the masculine term for “waiter.”

Apart from its general meaning of “a young male, (usually below the age of puberty, or still in school),” boy occurs in a great variety of idioms that refer not just to male human beings of any age, but to dogs as well.

Oh boy! Depending upon context and intonation, this exclamation can denote delight or dismay. For example, “Oh boy! I’ve won the lottery!” or, “Oh boy, you’re in trouble now.”

That’s my boy! A parent, proud of a son, might say this in approval of some accomplishment.

Old boys’ club/old boys’ network: network of social and professional connections that perpetuate favoritism in government and other sectors. The expression originated with the British “public school” system. (In the U.K., “public schools” are elite private schools attended by the children of the wealthy.) Male graduates of exclusive schools were called “old boys.” Because of connections forged in school, these “old boys” went on to occupy highly placed jobs in government and commerce, helped by a previous generation of “old boys” who made up a segment of insiders. By extension, the expression can be used to refer to any kind of favoritism that makes advancement difficult for outsiders.

There’s a good boy! An expression pet owners use with male dogs. Sometimes it is phrased as a question: “Who’s a good boy?”

Down, boy! This expression is used to address a dog that is jumping on someone.

Boys’ night out: A weekly social outing for friends, limited to men. [KC – Compare to “girls’ night out,” which would, of course be more fun because I’d be there with you. LOL.]

Boys will be boys: An expression of resigned acceptance uttered when men do something despicable that is considered to be characteristic of age or sex.

Send a boy to do a man’s job: to ask someone young, ill-equipped, or inexperienced to do difficult or complicated work. Usually in negative contexts, as “Never send a boy to do a man’s job.”

boy next door: Unlike most “boy” expressions, this one has a corresponding one for women: girl next door. The expressions denote a stereotypical personification of a young, unspoiled, admirable character whom one might safely fall in love with.

boy king: Tutankhamen is often referred to as “the boy king.” Boy can be used in a descriptive sense with any noun: “boy wonder,” “boy genius.”

My boy, Harvey, enjoying a Starbucks™ “puppuccino.”

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | October 23, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Folk Etymologies

After spending a few weeks on vacation in Germany, I could not resist sharing this list of folk etymologies from Daily Writing Tips with you. Munich and Berlin were full of oak trees, chestnuts, gin, and gingerbread. For more folk etymologies, click the link above.

This post lists words derived from words in other languages as a result of folk etymology, a process by which speakers adopt the foreign terms after revising them by using existing elements from their native language.

acorn: This word is descended from the Old English term aecerne, meaning “tree nut” but originally referring in various forms in Germanic languages to the trunk of a tree; by folk etymology, the current spelling derived from a false association with ac (“oak”) and corn (“grain”). (The word is, however, related to acre.)

chestnut: The name of a type of tree, the wood harvested from it, and the edible nut it produces stems from the Latin term castanea (probably itself borrowed from a language of Asia Minor) by way of Old French and Middle English. By the early 1500s, it was (redundantly) called a chesten nut; that word developed into the current form.

gin: Gin, the name for a liquor flavored with juniper berries, is a truncation of genever, related to the Old French term geniévre and the Dutch word jenever, all of which derive from the Latin word juniperus.

gingerbread: The name of the molasses- and ginger-based confection has nothing to do with bread; the term derives from the Old French word gingembrat, a variation of gimgembre, meaning “ginger.” Gingembrat, and its Middle English derivation gingebred, referred originally to a ginger paste used both in cooking and medicine.

spare rib: This term for a cut of pork ribs alludes to its scarcity of fat, but the source is the Middle Low German word ribbesper; sper meant “spear” or “spit” and referred to the method of roasting the meat on a spit. (Spear, spar, and spire are all related.)

Oktoberfest gingerbread cookies:

And my favorite menu item in all the land: The Hangman’s Lunch

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | October 18, 2018

Editor’s Corner: 20 Common Usage Mistakes

Good morning.

In linguistics, the term usage refers to the way words are used in a particular language. It’s not about grammar so much as it is about how words are used. I recently read an article by Jordan Conrad called 35 Mistakes to Avoid in Your Writing: A Cheat Sheet for Common English Grammar Mistakes. The article included 20 usage mistakes (commonly confused words) that I want to share with you.

I think you’ll notice that we’ve covered some of these before, but some are new, and we can all benefit from an occasional refresher. Here you go!

  1. Affect vs. Effect

Incorrect: The game will effect our standings in the league.

Correct: The game will affect our standings in the league.

Although both words can be used as nouns and verbs, effect is usually used as a noun and affect is usually used as a verb.

  1. Apart vs. A part

Incorrect: Can I be apart of your group?

Correct: Can I be a part of your group?

Apart is an adverb meaning, “separated by some distance.” These two rocks are three feet apart from each other. A part is two separate words, the article “a” and the noun “part.” Apart is usually paired with “from” and a part is usually paired with “of.”

  1. Assure vs. Ensure

Incorrect: You must take the proper precautions to assure your privacy.

Correct: You must take the proper precautions to ensure your privacy.

To ensure something happens is to guarantee it. Assure is to tell someone something positively or confidently to remove any doubt. Greg assured me nothing was wrong. In order to ensure that nothing was wrong, Greg locked the door.

  1. Who vs. Whom

Incorrect: Who did you give that to?

Correct: To whom did you give that?

Who functions as a subject while whom functions as an object. An easy way to re­member the difference is to substitute he/him into your sentences. If he works, it should be who. If him works, it should be whom. Who (he) told me to make dinner. You delivered a pizza to whom (him)?

  1. Attain vs. Obtain

Incorrect: Joe worked very hard and obtained a great level of success.

Correct: Joe worked very hard and attained a great level of success.

Attain and obtain are both verbs. Attain means “to accomplish, reach, or achieve something through effect.” Obtain means “to get, acquire, or to gain possession of something.” Attain implies effort put forth to produce the outcome.

  1. Break vs. Brake

Incorrect: There’s been a brake in the water pipe.

Correct: There’s been a break in the water pipe.

Break can be used as a noun and verb. To break something is to cause it to separate into pieces. A break is the act or action of breaking. We took a break at work. Brake can also be used as a noun and verb. To brake is to stop your car.

  1. Capital vs. Capitol

Incorrect: We took a tour of the capital building today.

Correct: We took a tour of the capitol building today.

Capital refers to a city, specifically a governmental seat. It can also be used in a financial sense to describe money or equipment. Capitol is a building where a legis­lature meets.

  1. Compliment vs. Complement

Incorrect: Today I received a nice complement from a friend.

Correct: Today I received a nice compliment from a friend.

A compliment is a flattering or praising remark. A complement is something that completes or brings something to perfection. Those shoes are the perfect comple­ment for that dress.

  1. Comprise vs. Compose

Incorrect: Fifty states comprise the United States.

Correct: Fifty states compose the United States.

Comprise means “to be made up of.” Compose means “to make up the constituent parts of.” With comprise, the whole is the subject. With compose, the parts are the subject.

  1. Emigrate vs. Immigrate

Incorrect: My grandparents emigrated into the United States.

Correct: My grandparents immigrated into the United States.

To immigrate is to enter a new place. To emigrate is to leave a place. You immigrate into places and emigrate from places.

  1. Everyday vs. Every day

Incorrect: I get coffee before work everyday.

Correct: I get coffee before work every day.

Everyday, when used as a single word, is an adjective meaning commonplace, usual, and suitable for ordinary days. Every day, two words, is an adverbial phrase. Substi­tuting “each day” for “every day” will help you keep them separated.

  1. Explicit vs. Implicit

Incorrect: Please be implicit; what is it that you want?

Correct: Please be explicit; what is it that you want?

To say something explicitly is to spell it out clearly so that it is unambiguous. Some­thing is implicit when it is implied or not said clearly and directly.

  1. Invoke vs. Evoke

Incorrect: This comic strip will invoke laughter.

Correct: This comic strip will evoke laughter.

To invoke is to assert something as authority or appeal to someone for help. Great Britain invoked military aid from the United States. To evoke is to bring someone forth or to recall something to the conscious mind. Invoke is a more direct action than evoke.

  1. Who vs. That

Incorrect: The woman that opened the door for you is my mom.

Correct: The woman who opened the door for you is my mom.

When referring to inanimate objects or animals without a name, use that. When re­ferring to human beings and animals with a name, use who. [dbb – There is some disagreement about this rule. Commonly, experts say to use
who when you’re talking about a person and that when you’re talking about an inanimate object regardless of whether you are using a name. Pets are a gray area, however, and both
who and that are acceptable.]

  1. Onto vs. On to

Incorrect: The cat jumped on to the dresser.

Correct: The cat jumped onto the dresser.

Onto is a preposition that means “on top of, to a position on.” On to, two words, is used when on is part of a verb phrase such as “held on.” She held on to the chains while swinging. A good trick is to mentally say “up” before “on” in a sentence. If it still makes sense, then onto is the correct choice.

  1. Passed vs. Past

Incorrect: The car past me on the left.

Correct: The car passed me on the left.

Passed implied movement of some sort. Past is a period of time before the present. Bill Clinton is a past president.

  1. To vs. Too vs. Two

Incorrect: There are to many people here.

Correct: There are too many people here.

Too means “also, very, or excessive.” Two is the number 2. I need two pizzas. To is just about everything else. Can you drive me to the mall?

  1. There vs. Their vs. They’re

Incorrect: All of there equipment was loaded into the truck.

Correct: All of their equipment was loaded into the truck.

There is a directional word and is usually paired with “is” or “are.” Over there is a crocodile. Their is possessive. Their house is very cute. They’re is a contraction of “they are.” They’re (they are) moving in next door.

  1. Toward vs. Towards

The difference between towards and toward is entirely dialectal. In American Eng­lish, you should use toward. In British English, you should use towards.

  1. Principal vs. Principle

Incorrect: Mr. Babcock is the principle of the high school.

Correct: Mr. Babcock is the principal of the high school.

Principal refers to a person of high authority or prominence. It also has specific meanings in finance and law. How much have you repaid on the principal of your loan? Principle is a natural, moral legal rule or standard. The principle of free speech is essential in any democracy.

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

Symitar Documentation Services

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | October 16, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Terse with your verse?

Last week I wrote about some things to consider if you tend to be verbose in your communication. Today I have some advice for people who are the opposite—you know, you generally respond with the most minimal communication possible. That’s okay sometimes, but other times, when you get an email and the sender asks, “Do you want me to help this client with their website or their ATM?” and you answer “Yes,” well, there are a couple issues there. J

For those of you who do not write much or who are looking to add a little more to your writing, consider these questions:

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

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