Posted by: episystechpubs | June 30, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Doxing

Almost two months ago, Donna discussed the new term Sealioning. I was really excited when I read that there’s a term doxing, because I thought it might have something to do with dachshunds (doxies) and I wanted to surprise my doxie-owning coworker, Ron. Unfortunately, there are no dogs involved with this term.

The word doxing means to publish somebody’s personal information or to reveal their identity without their consent, often accompanied by threats and intimidation. In this case “dox” is short for “documents.” One example, according to the article, was from 2013. “Several high-profile celebrities, including Beyoncé and Kim Kardashian, were the victims of doxing after a hacker publicly revealed their addresses, social security numbers, and financial documents online.” Yuck. Life would be so much better if we just stuck to doing kind things and being loveable like dogs.

There were some other new and interesting words in this article from Dictionary.com. Here are a couple of them.

I was watching 9-1-1 (Austin or Lone Star or something), a show that entertains me with firefighters and police while I’m making dinner. On one of the episodes, there was someone calling the police and falsely reporting a serious crime. There’s a name for that! It’s called swatting (based on the SWAT teams called for potentially volatile situations). In the show, the intent was to have the police go to a man’s house full-force because he was an alleged kidnapper, drug dealer, and loser. The man ended up dying. As the dictionary says, “Swatting is extremely dangerous due to the unpredictable nature of such scenarios, when law enforcement officials believe they are entering a highly dangerous situation.” We’ve seen the results of that in the news. Let’s keep our swatting to flies!

Lastly, firehosing. Back to the firemen? Nope. In this case, firehosing is a tactic used to spread propaganda. It means to “release a large amount of false information in a very short amount of time. Due to the resources often needed to pull off such an expansive disinformation strategy, the term is most often used to refer to the actions of large organizations or government.”

The examples they mention include Russian propaganda during the invasion of Ukraine, Chinese propaganda responding to reports about the mistreatment of Uyghur Muslims, and, well, several events here in the U.S. where misinformation was spread.

These are only some of the new terms. Since they dragged me (and maybe you) down, I think we need to end with something better than doxing, swatting, and firehosing.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 28, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Limericks

Hello, fellow travelers! Since we had so much fun learning about Japanese wakas and haiku, let’s check out something along similar lines: the limerick. The definition of a limerick according to Merriam-Webster is:

A short, humorous five-line poem. [KC – Often written in quite bawdy and naughty language.] While the origin of this type of verse is unknown, some believe that the name limerick comes from the chorus of an 18th-century Irish soldiers’ song "Will You Come Up to Limerick?" to which were added impromptu verses. The Limerick referenced in this chorus is a port city in southwestern Ireland.

In a limerick, the first, second, and fifth line rhyme, and the third and fourth lines rhyme. The rhyming lines also have about the same number of syllables. Here is a more visual representation of the lines that rhyme and the ones that share the syllabic patterns:

a

a

b

b

a

Perhaps the best way to get the limerick concept and rhyme scheme across is to share a few with you!

The limerick packs laughs anatomical

Into space that is quite economical.

But the good ones I’ve seen

So seldom are clean,

And the clean ones so seldom are comical.

(by Vivian Holland)

I hope it won’t come as a shock

That Christmas I hazard to mock:

It’s the one day that we

Sit around a dead tree

Eating candy right out of a sock.

(by Richard Lederer)

There once was a lady named Ferris

Whom nothing could ever embarrass.

‘Til the bath salts one day,

in the tub where she lay,

turned out to be Plaster of Paris.

A magazine writer named Bing

Could make copy from most anything

But the copy he wrote

of a ten-dollar note

Was so good he now lives in Sing Sing.

An oyster from Kalamazoo

Confessed he was feeling quite blue.

For he said, “As a rule,

When the weather turns cool,

I invariably get in a stew.”

A wonderful bird is the pelican

His bill holds more than his belican

He can take in his beak

Enough food for a week

But I’m damned if I see how the helican.

A bather whose clothing was strewed

By breezes that left her quite nude,

Saw a man come along

And, unless I am wrong,

You expect this last line to be lewd!

A tutor who tooted a flute

Tried to teach two young tooters to toot.

Said the two to the tutor,

Is it harder to toot, or…

To tutor two tooters to toot?”

I hope you enjoyed these. I did, and as I am slimming down my collection of books on grammar, sign errors, funny comments from church newsletters, and other things I have written about in the past, I think it might be time for another contest!

Please send your great limericks to me

And make sure they are rated PG.

Any topic is fine

I am sure they will shine

And I’ll send out some presents for three.

I’ll give you a few weeks to work on these. The due date is July 15, 2022, and as usual, you can send me as many entries as you like. I will pick the three winners randomly. Good luck!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 23, 2022

Editor’s Corner: You

Learning other languages can be tough. One of the things that English speakers have a difficult time with, when learning another language, is learning the informal and formal translations of the word you. Spanish has and usted; French has tu and vous; German has du and Sie, and the list goes on. Well, today I have some interesting information for everyone. Back in merry old England, we used to have informal and formal versions of the word you: thou, thee, and you.

From Grammar Girl:

Since thee and thou have survived mainly in religious and poetic writing, you may be surprised to learn that thee and thou were the informal pronouns. You was formal, and thou was informal.

From the 15th to 16th centuries, thou was used for someone of a lower class or someone you were very familiar with. A parent would’ve referred to their child as thou; a child would’ve referred to their parent as you. About a hundred years later, social status became less obvious, and people started using the more formal you, no matter who they were speaking to. This way, whether you were addressing someone above or below you in status, you were less like to insult them.

While many English speakers started dropping thee and thou, the Quakers continued to use them because according to Grammar Girl, “they aimed to be egalitarian, embrace humility, and avoid markers of class and status. They believed that addressing a social superior as you fanned the flames of vanity.” As time moved on, this became a problem for the Quakers. Thee and thou started being used as insults, and the Quakers were called out for using the familiar, formerly lower-class options. A story from the founder of the Quakers, George Fox said:

We were often beset and abused, and sometimes in danger of our lives for using these words to some proud men, who would say, “What! You ill-bred clown, do you thou me?” It’s hard to understand now, but at the time, it was almost unthinkable to call a superior thou.

It’s kind of funny that we now think of thee and thou as a more formal way to speak, when it was just the opposite. I hope you have found this as interesting as I have.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 21, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Body Parts

In a recent article from Daily Writing Tips, they wrote about different body parts being used as verbs, such as, “My dog nosed through the garbage, looking for scraps.” They also discussed some figurative uses and idioms related to body parts, which are the items that I’m going to share with you. The definitions are from the article; the sentences in blue are from me.

to head
to be at the head of; to lead

Darcy headed up the bake sale and encouraged 20 students to make 75 cookies each.

to eye
to consider (a company, property, business opportunity, etc.) with a view to acquisition or development.

I saw Miles eyeing a box of doughnuts on the desk, but he didn’t take one because he’s on a diet.

to nose
To detect or discover as if by means of a keen sense of smell.

Baxter nosed his way through the living room, upturned three pillows, and discovered a bone.

Nose is used as a verb in several other idioms:

to nose around: to search furtively for something, to pry

Aletha sat on the stoop each day, where she found it easiest to nose around the neighbors and their business.

to nose ahead: to gain a slight advantage

On their third lap around the course, Black Caviar nosed ahead of Spectacular Bid and won first place.


to nose out
: to defeat by a narrow margin

The incumbent senator barely nosed out her opponent after the news of her affair was made public.

to mouth
to utter words or statements rhetorically or insincerely; to pay lip service to.

The employees were tired of management mouthing platitudes about how lucky the employees were, while only the management received benefits and bonuses.

Other verbal uses of mouth:

to mouth off: to express one’s opinion in a forceful, uninhibited or indiscreet manner; to be abusive or offensive; to brag.

Nadine’s father had heard enough. “After three F bombs and all of your mouthing off young lady, you just bought yourself two weeks without your phone or TV, and you’re grounded!”

to bad-mouth
to abuse or deprecate verbally; to criticize, slander, or gossip maliciously about.

I hate to bad-mouth Brenda, but she never helps pay for party supplies and yet she eats at least three pieces of every cake.

to shoulder
to take upon oneself as a burden, such as an expense or heavy responsibility.

The richest employees will shoulder the burden of paying for the new pinball machine.

to finger
to identify an offender

The mugging victim looked at the six men in the line-up and fingered #4 as the offender.

to stomach
to tolerate, put up with.

I just can’t stomach any more shows about celebrity lifestyles.

to foot the bill
to pay or settle a bill, especially one which is large or unreasonable, or which has been run up by another party.

The local businesses were making the neighborhood foot the bill for business district improvements, but that stopped when the neighborhood realized our taxes went up for something that was not put to a vote.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 16, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Portmanteau Revisited

We cover all kinds of words here at the Editor’s Corner: homonyms, eponyms, eggcorns, mondegreens, and many, many more. Today, I want to revisit portmanteaus, which were covered several years back by my editing friend, Jackie.

As Jackie said then, a portmanteau is “a word or morpheme whose form and meaning are derived from a blending of two or more distinct forms (as smog from smoke and fog).” Portmanteau also means a trunk or suitcase that opens into two parts. The word portmanteau comes from the word porter (to carry) and manteau (cloak).

In his novel Through the Looking Glass (now commonly known as Alice in Wonderland), author Lewis Carroll created at least two beautiful portmanteaus: chortle (chuckle + snort) and slithy (slimy + lithe) and many more words that are close enough: frabjous (fabulous + joyous) and frumious (fuming + furious).

These are such useful words, and they evoke such wonderful imagery. If you haven’t already started thinking of all the portmanteaus you know of, here’s a long but still partial list of some we use today (not all are listed in a dictionary):

  • alphanumeric (alphabet + numeric)
  • anklet (ankle + bracelet)
  • bash (bang + smash)
  • bodacious (bold + audacious)
  • Bollywood (Bombay + Hollywood)
  • brainiac (brain + maniac)
  • Brexit (Britain + exit)
  • bromance (brother + romance)
  • brunch (breakfast + lunch)
  • camcorder (camera + recorder)
  • carjack (car + highjack)
  • chillax (chill + relax)
  • cyborg (cybernetic + organism)
  • dumbfound (dumb + confound)
  • emoticon (emotion + icon)
  • frenemy (friend + enemy)
  • glamping (glamor + camping)
  • guesstimate (guess + estimate)
  • hangry (hungry + angry)
  • hassle (haggle + tussle)
  • internet (interconnected + network)
  • jeggings (jeans + leggings)
  • labradoodle (Labrador + poodle)
  • modem (modulator + demodulator)
  • moped (motor + pedal)
  • motel (motor + hotel)
  • podcast (iPod + broadcast)
  • scuzzy (scummy + fuzzy)
  • skort (shirt + shorts)
  • snark (snide + remark) also snarky
  • snazzy (snappy + jazzy)
  • tween (teen + between)
  • vlog (video + log)
  • webinar (web + seminar)
  • Wi-Fi (wireless + fidelity)
  • workaholic (work + alcoholic)

I hope you have a fantabulous day today!

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Posted by: episystechpubs | June 14, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Day of the Dads

The other day, one of you asked me a great question about a particular day or event and whether it required an apostrophe. It wasn’t the Farmers Market or Veterans Day, but here’s an explanation similar to the one I gave, and it mentions how to handle different holidays. From GrammarBook.com:

Do You Use an Apostrophe When Spelling Father’s Day?

The most direct answer is yes. The Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) and The Associated Press Stylebook list the following holidays as singular possessives: Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day.

CMOS uses the plural possessive for Presidents’ Day, while AP writes Presidents Day. Both agree on no apostrophe in Veterans Day.

We have heard from readers who object to the apostrophe in Father’s Day because it implies one father. There are several scenarios in which a person can have two fathers: a father and stepfather, a biological father and adopted father, or a child being raised in a home with two fathers. The same can be true of two mothers.

Our post Apostrophes and False Possessives discusses how in English, nouns become adjectives all the time. If you think of the word Fathers as an adjective describing the word Day, then you would not use an apostrophe. It would be a day for fathers. The same could be said for using the plural possessive Fathers’ Day. It is a day belonging to all fathers.

No matter how many dads you have, according to our style guide it is still Father’s Day with the apostrophe. Don’t forget to give your dad a call, send him a card, or take him out to breakfast, if you can. If he’s not around anymore, take yourself out for breakfast and raise a cup of coffee or a mimosa to the man!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 9, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Roots

Good morning, folks! I hope you are feeling well and ready for a little bit of word history from Richard Lederer, our local verbivore, author, and columnist. Thanks to Ron F. for saving these articles and sharing them with us! You know me, I love digging into the etymologies of words. This article, Growing Your Vocabulary by Digging Down to the Roots, is a nice demonstration of how knowing the roots of words can help you learn new terms. Let me turn it over to Mr. Lederer:

Words and people have a lot in common. Like people, words are born, grow up, get married, have children and even die. And, like people, words come in families — big and beautiful families. A word family is a cluster of words that are related because they contain the same root. A root is a basic building block of language from which a variety of related words are formed. You can grow your vocabulary by digging down to the roots of an unfamiliar word and identifying the meanings of those roots.

For example, knowing that the roots scribe and script mean “write” will help you to deduce the meanings of a prolific clan of words, including ascribe, conscript, describe, inscribe, manuscript, nondescript, postscript, prescribe, proscribe, scribble, scripture and transcribe. For another example, once you know that dic and dict are roots that mean “speak or say,” you possess a key that unlocks the meanings of dozens of related words, including abdicate, benediction, contradict, dedicate, dictator, Dictaphone, dictionary, dictum, edict, indicate, indict, interdict, jurisdiction, malediction, predict, syndicate, valedictorian, verdict, vindicate and vindictive. [KC – For the full article, click the link above.]

You can expand your verbal powers by learning to look an unfamiliar word squarely in the eye and asking, “What are the roots in the word, and what do they mean?”

Here are 20 word parts descended from either Latin or Greek, each followed by three words containing each root. From the meanings of the clue words, deduce the meaning of each root, as in PHON – microphone, phonics, telephone = sound.

[KC – This is a great exercise to help you learn some important roots. The answers are at the bottom.]

1. AUTO – autobiography, autograph, automaton = _______

2. CHRON – chronic, chronology, synchronize = _______

3. CULP – culpable, culprit, exculpate = _______

4. EU – eugenics, eulogy, euphemism = _______

5. GREG – congregation, gregarious, segregate = _______

6. LOQU – eloquent, loquacious, soliloquy = _______

7. MAGN – magnanimous, magnify, magnitude = _______

8. NOV – innovation, novelty, renovate = _______

9. OMNI – omnipotent, omniscient, omnivorous = _______

10. PHIL – bibliophile, philanthropy, philology = _______

11. SOL – isolate, soliloquy, solitary = _______

12. SOPH – philosopher, sophistication, sophomore = _______

13. TELE – telegraph, telephone, television = _______

14. TEN – tenacious, tenure, untenable = _______

15. TRACT – extract, intractable, tractor = _______

16. VAC – evacuate, vacation, vacuum = _______

17. VERT – convert, introvert, vertigo = _______

18. VIV – survivor, vivacious, vivid = _______

19. VOC – invoke, vocal, vociferous = _______

20. VOL – malevolent, volition, voluntary = _______

******************************************************************************

Answers

1. AUTO = self

2. CHRON = time

3. CULP = blame

4. EU = good

5. GREG = kind, species

6. LOQU = speak

7. MAGN = large

8. NOV = new

9. OMNI = all

10. PHIL = love

11. SOL = alone

12. SOPH = wise, wisdom

13. TELE = far away

14. TEN = hold

15. TRACT = pull

16. VAC = empty

17. VERT = turn

18. VIV = life, lively

19. VOC = call, voice

20. VOL = wish

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 7, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Drop a Dime

You know me—well, many of you do through Editor’s Corner—I love detective novels and police procedurals, particularly of the Law and Order variety. Thursday nights this year have been fabulous: Special Victims Unit, Law and Order (the original), and Organized Crime—three for the price of one! Today we’re going to look at the phrase “drop a dime on” meaning to rat someone out, snitch on someone, or inform on a criminal by calling the police.

The following description is from our buddies at the Grammarist.

Drop a dime is an idiom with an evolving definition.

The original meaning of drop a dime is to secretly report a lawbreaker to the police, to snitch on a fellow criminal, to anonymously betray a criminal partner. The term drop a dime first appeared in detective novels in the 1920s-1930s. The idiom drop a dime conjures the image of someone putting a dime in a payphone to call the police and betray or “rat out” a criminal.

Informants used payphones because short phone calls could not be traced, especially without prior warning of the incoming phone call. Even though payphones have passed out of usage, this meaning of the idiom does not seem to have waned….

Interestingly, the term drop a dime has also evolved into an American basketball term, dropping dimes, which means giving an assist on a play. Also, the expression is increasingly seen in American football to mean to throw a pass accurately.

Remember, snitches get stitches! (And good luck trying to find a pay phone. I just saw some tourists in Mexico taking a photo of a pay phone because it was so “quaint.”)

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | June 2, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Mistaken Word Pairs

Happy Thursday to you!

I frequently listen to the radio and podcasts, and I often hear words being used in ways that are a little off. Over the past few weeks, I heard the following word pairs being misused. The definitions are similar, but the words have distinct meanings:

  • expect vs. suspect
  • assume vs. presume
  • imply vs. infer

I’m not sure why these nuances thrill me so. Some people (my husband, one of my sons, the cashier who works the “15 items or less” lane at my neighborhood grocery store) think I’m a stickler, and then some people (my mom, my best friend, and some of you, I hope) find these subtleties interesting. If you are interested, read on.

I’ll start with the words expect and suspect. Both words, when used as verbs, look to the future, but they are looking with slightly different moods. Here are the definitions along with examples of proper use:

  • expect: to look for (mentally); to look forward to, as to something that is believed to be about to happen or come; to have a previous apprehension of, whether of good or evil, to look for with some confidence; to anticipate

Example: I expect to have the project plans by the end of the day.

  • suspect: to imagine to exist; to have a slight or vague opinion of the existence of, without proof, and often upon weak evidence or no evidence; to mistrust; to surmise

Example: I suspect that John will arrive late to dinner with a fantastic excuse.

Another pair of words that are often confused are assume and presume. These words are a little tricker because both words mean “to take something as true”; however, there is a slight difference in meaning.

  • assume: to take as true with little supporting evidence

Example: I assume that everyone likes chocolate as much as I do.

  • presume: to be confident or have evidence that something is true

Example: Just because you failed this test, don’t presume you’ll fail the next one.

And finally, let’s look at the words imply and infer. These words get mixed up a lot because they both deal with indirect suggestions:

  • imply: to suggest or to say something in an indirect way

Tip: When we imply something, we’re hinting at what we mean without saying it directly.

Example: He didn’t promise, but he did imply that he would take the job.

  • infer: to suppose or come to a conclusion, especially based on indirect suggestion

Tip: When we make an educated guess about something we think someone implied, we’re inferring.

Example: You can probably infer that she won’t be back based on her shocked expression and hasty retreat.

It might help to think of imply and infer almost as opposites. When you imply, you are giving a hint about something. When you infer you are making an educated guess about something.

I expect you all to have a wonderful day today.

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

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Posted by: episystechpubs | May 31, 2022

Editor’s Corner: Jokes for Language Lovers

Hello readers! Today I’m taking a bit of a vacation and letting Richard Lederer entertain you with A Buffet of Tidbits to Tickle a Language Lover’s Palate, from my dear buddy, Ron F.

A group of third-grade pupils were sitting in a circle with their teacher. She was going around in turn asking them all questions about animals:

“Davy, what noise does a cow make?”
“It goes moo.”
“Alice, what sound does a lamb make?”
“It goes baa.”
“Jimmy, what noise does a cat make?”
“It goes meow.”
“Jennifer, what sound does a mouse make?”
“Uhm . . ., it goes . . . click!”

* * *

A school principal came into a teacher’s classroom and said she was spending too much time teaching about commas because they weren’t really that important in communicating content. So the teacher had a student write the sentence “The principal says the teacher is wrong” on the board and then asked the principal to put a comma after the word principal and another after the word teacher.

The result, of course, was “The principal, says the teacher, is wrong.”

* * *

What do you say to comfort a friend who’s struggling with grammar? “There, their, they’re.”

* * *

It’s helpful if you imagine your auto-correct to be a tiny gremlin inside your computer who tries hard to be helpful but who is, in fact, quite drunk and subject to Inconsonants and Irritable Vowel Syndrome. Breaking news! The inventor of auto-correct has died. His funnel will be held tomato.

* * *

The best online password is “incorrect.” Why? Because every time you key in the wrong password, your computer will remind you that “Your password is incorrect.”

* * *

Always remember to keep your eyes on the prize, your nose to the grindstone, your shoulder to the wheel, your hand on the tiller, your face to the wind, your chin up, your ear to the ground, and your foot on the pedal. Then go see your chiropractor.

* * *

I recently attended the immersive Van Gogh experience at the Del Mar fairgrounds. 300 paintings. 2 million pixels, original music — spectacular! The only downer was that I didn’t have enough Monet to buy Degas to make the Van Gogh!

* * *

Some of you may wonder how my wife puts up with living with a compulsive punster. Well, the other day, I said to her, “Did you hear my last pun?” She replied, “I sure hope so!”

Enjoy your day!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

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