Posted by: episystechpubs | January 17, 2019

Editor’s Corner: Capitalizing Email Subject Lines

A few people have asked me whether to capitalize email subject lines. Although the question is straightforward, it’s a tough one to answer.

Donna and Kara wrote previously about email etiquette and email subject lines, but they didn’t address this particular point. I wasn’t able to find a relevant rule in any of our style guides, and an informal survey of my inbox found a 50/50 split.

While I can’t answer this question as definitively as I’d like to, I can provide some suggestions.

Three Rules for Writing Email Subject Lines

Here are three rules you should always follow when writing email subject lines:

  1. Capitalize the first word.
    Incorrect: delicious pancake recipe
  1. Capitalize proper nouns.
    Incorrect: Surprise party for ernesto on saturday
  1. Don’t capitalize every letter.
    Incorrect: BALLROOM DANCING LESSONS

Tip: Kara’s post has some suggestions for writing attention-grabbing subject lines.

As long as you follow those three rules, you can choose between sentence-style capitalization and headline-style capitalization.

Option 1: Sentence-Style Capitalization

Capitalize the subject line as if it were a sentence. In other words, don’t capitalize any words except the first word and proper nouns.

Examples:

  • Funny kitten video
  • Don’t forget our Wednesday meeting
  • Wherefore art thou Romeo?

You can use sentence-style capitalization even if the subject line is not a complete sentence. Some people say that sentence-style capitalization seems more conversational, so you might decide to use it for casual emails and avoid it in a formal context.

Option 2: Headline-Style Capitalization

Capitalize major words (such as nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs), in addition to proper nouns and the first word of the subject line. Lowercase minor words (such as articles, prepositions, and conjunctions). Capitalize the last word of the subject line, regardless of what part of speech it is.

Examples:

  • Dogs Wearing Sunglasses
  • Turn the Music Off
  • What Light through Yonder Window Breaks?

You can use headline-style capitalization even if the subject line is a complete sentence. Some people say that headline-style capitalization looks strange for longer subject lines, so length is another factor you can consider.

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

Ben Ritter | Technical Editor | Symitar®
8985 Balboa Avenue | San Diego, CA 92123
619-682-3391 | or ext. 763391 | www.Symitar.com

Symitar Documentation Services

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | January 15, 2019

Editor’s Corner: Richard Lederer on Vincent

Good morning, all.

It has been a dark and gloomy week in San Diego, reminding me of my youth in Seattle. It’s very busy at work, so I am going to share excerpts from Richard Lederer’s column rather than write my own today. It’s about Vincent van Gogh, and he had a rough life. My goal is to bring a little bit of sunshine (or sunflowers) to your day, so I’m going to share some excerpts with you. If you’d like to read the entire article, you can find it here: Verbivore

…for more than a century those who lived after him have learned to see the world through the eyes of Vincent van Gogh, who, living alone and unattended, speaks to us across time and powerfully influences the course of modern art.

The last lines of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem “Kubla Khan” paints a portrait that could be Vincent van Gogh:

And all should cry, Beware! Beware!

His flashing eyes, his floating hair!

Weave a circle round him thrice,

And close your eyes with holy dread,

For he on honey-dew hath fed,

And drunk the milk of Paradise.

Born on March 30, 1853. van Gogh, between 1872 and 1890, wrote hundreds of letters to his younger brother, Theo, his only constant ally and support during a lifetime of struggle. This exchange between two affectionate brothers reveals Vincent as a keen intellectual fully connected to 19th-century thought.

“Mysteries remain, and sorrow or melancholy, but that eternal negative is balanced by the positive work which is thus achieved after all. If life were as simple, and things as little complicated by a goody-goody’s story or the hackneyed sermon of the average clergyman, it wouldn’t be so very difficult to make one’s way. But it isn’t, and things are infinitely more complicated, and right and wrong do not exist separately, any more than black and white do in nature.”

Van Gogh was an avid reader, and the authentic literary style of his letters reflects his love of books. In his letters the artist exhibits a remarkable ability to paint with words and to marshal words to talk about his painting:

· I dream of painting and then I paint my dream.

· Paintings have a life of their own that derives from the painter’s soul.

· Painting is a faith and it imposes the duty to disregard public opinion.

· I am always doing what I can’t do yet in order to learn how to do it.

· A good picture is equivalent to a good deed.

· There is nothing more truly artistic than to love others.

· Art is life seeking itself. It is our intractable expression of love for the beauties, ideas and epiphanies we regularly find.

· When I have a terrible need for religion, I go out and paint the stars.

And of course, I can’t do these paintings justice because you can’t see the individual brush strokes or the texture, but here are some of the paintings from the article, and one I saw in Amsterdam at the Van Gogh Museum (Almond Blossom).

Starry Night

Sunflowers

Almond Blossom

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | January 10, 2019

Editor’s Corner: Commas with Nonessential Elements

Good morning, and welcome to another installation of the Comma series. I’d like to say, “brought to you by popular demand,” but that might be a bit of a stretch, so I’ll say, “brought to you by a modicum of interest.” Hey, I’ll take what I can get. Please keep reading.

This week, I’m sharing information about commas with nonessential elements. These commas are placed next to the clause in a sentence that is not essential to the meaning of the sentence. Here are a few examples of sentences with the nonessential clauses and commas highlighted:

  • The company, which is headquartered in Missouri, has an impeccable reputation.
  • The dog, wagging its tail, ran toward the woman.
  • Tatyana, who immigrated from Russia, decided to become a U.S. citizen.
  • She sings for the band, which plays every Friday night.

Nonessential information can be removed without changing the meaning of the sentence, as shown in these revisions of the previous examples:

  • The company has an impeccable reputation.
  • The dog ran toward the woman.
  • Tatyana decided to become a U.S. citizen.
  • She sings for the band.

Sometimes information can be essential or nonessential depending on context. If, using the first example, it’s important to note that the company is headquartered in Missouri, you would need to revise the sentence to make that clear:

  • The company is headquartered in Missouri and has an impeccable reputation.

If you wanted to emphasize that the dog was happy to see the woman, you would revise that sentence—maybe like this:

  • The dog was wagging its tail as it ran toward the woman.

The same is true for the remaining examples. As the writer, you decide whether information is essential or nonessential and punctuate accordingly, remembering that nonessential elements are set off with a comma or between two commas.

The editor, who loves writing these articles, is now signing off.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

Symitar Documentation Services

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | January 8, 2019

Editor’s Corner: Asterisks

Today I’d like to talk to you about asterisks. I know we’ve discussed them before, but I continue to see them misused so it seems like time for a refresher.

What’s an asterisk? It’s a little star (*) on your keyboard. Truly, that’s what it looks like, and that’s what it means. From the Online Etymology Dictionary:

asterisk (n.)

"figure used in printing and writing to indicate footnote, omission, etc., or to distinguish words or phrases as conjectural," late 14c., asterich, asterisc, from Late Latin asteriscus, from Greek asteriskos "little star," diminutive of aster "star"

Asterisks are generally used for two things: to introduce a footnote, or to represent characters that have been removed.

First, let’s talk about footnotes. If you’re writing something that doesn’t require pages and pages of footnotes, you can probably get away with using an asterisk. The asterisk in this case goes after the sentence for which you are creating a footnote. Then, a second asterisk goes at the bottom of the page before the footnote reference.

For example, on the left is an excerpt from an article. The phrase ending “…the Spenserian stanza” is followed by an asterisk, and at the bottom of the page the asterisk appears again, noting the source of the article.

You might also see asterisks in advertisements, signaling that more information is coming elsewhere on the page. For example, this advertisement has an asterisk after the initial price. This asterisk indicates that there is more information to follow…down near the bottom of the ad.

The mistake I see most often is that when people use an asterisk, they do not follow with the footnote or additional information. The asterisk says, “Hey, look at me!” and then when you look down at the bottom of the page, there is nothing there. That causes a lot of frustration and confusion to your readers. So, if you use an asterisk like this, make sure that you follow it up with another asterisk at the bottom that contains the follow-up information or footnote.

Note: The other thing about using an asterisk rather than numbers is that the text can get clunky. If you need more than one footnote, the asterisk is followed by the dagger (†), double dagger (‡), section mark (§), parallels (), and number sign (#); when you run out of those, you start doubling those characters, so then you would have ** , ††, ‡‡, etc. The bottom of your document will start looking like cave paintings. Most word processing software makes numbered footnotes easy—so I’d opt for the footnotes.

The second common use of the asterisk is to represent missing characters. Here at JHA, we might see the asterisks representing password characters. Out in the big, bad world, asterisks are often used in place of letters to represent swear words.

For more information on asterisks and links to other articles, see the Editor’s Corner from several years ago titled Little Star.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | January 3, 2019

Editor’s Corner: “In Process” or “In Progress”?

In the interest of starting the new year with a clean slate, over the next few weeks, I’m going to be tackling some difficult reader questions that I’ve been putting off answering.

This first question comes from Brandon, who wrote, “I always thought [in process and
in progress] meant the same thing. Then, the more I thought about it, I figured in process may be used to describe something not yet started, or in the beginning stages and thought. Whereas in progress denotes something underway or progressing and in action.”

My initial thought was that in progress is the correct term and that people who say in process are confusing it with the similar phrase in the process of.

The following sentences are both correct. The main difference is that the first emphasizes the action (renovation) and the second emphasizes the person doing the action (my brother).

  • The renovation is in progress.
  • My brother is in the process of renovating.

But what about the sentence, “The renovation is in process”? It sounds strange to me, and a quick Google search confirms that the phrase in progress is about seven times as common as in process.

However, according to Merriam-Webster, this use of in process is correct. (They give the example, “the job is not yet finished but is still in process.”) And if it’s good enough for Merriam-Webster, it’s good enough for me.

As for the question of whether in process and in progress mean the same thing, my answer is basically yes. Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary says they’re synonyms, and the Unabridged Dictionary gives definitions that are strikingly similar:

  • process: a progressive forward movement from one point to another on the way to completion
  • progress: an advance or movement to an objective or toward a goal

I did find several sources online that do differentiate between in progress and in process. For example, Investopedia says, “Some people differentiate between work in progress and work in process based on the duration of the production cycle.”

However, as with all jargon, if you’re writing for a general audience, be aware that the reader might interpret the terms differently or might not observe a distinction at all.

Avoid possible confusion by writing sentences that aren’t open to interpretation. Instead of writing, “We have two projects in process and one project in progress,” write something like, “We have two projects with a target completion date of January 5, 2019, and one project with a target completion date of late 2021.”

Thanks for the great question, Brandon, and happy new year to all of our readers.

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

Ben Ritter | Technical Editor | Symitar®
8985 Balboa Avenue | San Diego, CA 92123
619-682-3391 | or ext. 763391 | www.Symitar.com

Symitar Documentation Services

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | December 31, 2018

Editor’s Corner: ‘Twas the night before New Year’s…

Hello and a Happy New Year’s Eve Day to you!

Looking for a fabulous way to start off 2019? Daily Writing Tips has provided us with a list of 41 synonyms for good that are certain to make things interesting. Click here to see the full list of words. I have a few of my favorite here for you to start with.

I hope 2019 is your most exquisite, dazzling, five-star year ever!

  1. breathtaking – amazing, surprising, astonishing, enough to make you gasp with pleasure, and almost enough to make you forget to breathe.
  2. dazzling – amazing, splendid, brilliant, shining so bright that it’s hard to see it.
  3. delightful – causing joy, delight, or pleasure, producing positive emotion, with the same Latin root as “delectable.”
  4. deluxe – high quality, related to luxury, from the Latin for “excess.”
  5. exceptional – uncommon, rare, and better for being so.
  6. exquisite – exceptionally fine or rare, with the sense of extreme
  7. favorable – helpful, encouraging, positive, convenient, such as getting hoped-for results.
  8. first-rate – exceptionally good, in the highest class. Describing a British naval vessel with more than 100 guns.
  9. formidable – causing awe, respect, wonder, or even fear, perhaps because it’s so large or strong.
  10. gilt-edged – high quality, from the practice of putting a thin layer of gold on the edges of a book.
  11. gratifying – pleasing, satisfying, making someone content.
  12. incredible – amazing, beyond belief, almost too good to be true.
  13. magnificent – splendid, elegant, noble. From the Latin word for “great deeds.”
  14. prime – first, as in first quality.
  15. satisfying – sufficient, pleasing, more than adequate.
  16. shipshape – well-organized, fully prepared, meticulous, tidy. Before you embark on an ocean voyage, you want your ship to be in shape.
  17. sterling – of high, verifiable value, as in sterling silver, which is 92.5% pure silver. Originally referring to British coins, which had a star or a starling on them in the Middle Ages.
  18. striking – impressive, memorable, calling to mind the striking of a coin.
  19. top-notch – belonging to the highest level, possibly from some 19th century game that used notches to keep score.
  20. welcome – anticipated, a pleasure to see, received with gladness, as in “welcome news.” From the Old English for “a wished-for guest.”

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | December 27, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Commas with Introductory Phrases

I wrote recently about the comma rule for conjunctions. No one sent me hate mail. In fact, a few of you thanked me for the refresher. So, I’m taking that as permission to share another comma rule with you today: commas with introductory (also called transitional) words and phrases. It’s your own fault!

These commas signal where the introductory element ends and the main part of the sentence (the independent clause) begins.

Following are some examples of sentences that being with an introductory word or phrase:

  • In fact, a few of you thanked me for the refresher.
  • Meanwhile, the children were running, jumping, and doing cartwheels in the school cafeteria.
  • Therefore, your hands are tied, and you’ll need to speak with your attorney.
  • On the other hand, her quiet nature might make her an ideal roommate.
  • To put it another way, half-eaten pizzas are nonrefundable.
  • Without a doubt, you are the happiest undertaker I’ve ever met.
  • When the long meeting ended, the staff exited the room like bats out of hell.
  • While packing for her trip, Judy realized she forgot to book a flight for her husband.

Notice that in all the examples, the clause that comes after the introduction and the comma is an independent clause, meaning it is a complete sentence that can stand on its own. The introductory phrase, on the other hand, does not make sense alone; it only introduces the independent clause or serves as a transition between sentences.

To put it another way, if you begin your sentence with a dependent clause followed by an independent clause, you need a comma between the two. Easy, right? You’ve got this!

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

Symitar Documentation Services

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | December 24, 2018

Editor’s Corner: 2018 Word of the Year

It’s that time of the year when most dictionaries publish the most “looked up” word or words of the year. As you will see from this look at Merriam-Webster’s list, people are curious about day-to-day events in our country and words they read or hear in the news. This is just a partial list, but the full list is here, from Daily Writing Tips.

Happy holidays! I hope you enjoy your day off tomorrow!

The Word of the Year, justice, was newsworthy in several contexts. The primary sense is that of administration or maintenance of fairness and lawfulness, and increasing concern about social justice has brought the concept, and the term that represents it, to the forefront in our society. But justice is a job title as well as a concept, referring to a judge on a national or state supreme court or similar body, and the controversy over confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh as an associate justice of the US Supreme Court also led people to check the definition. (The senior member of a supreme court is often titled “chief justice,” while the others are designated “associate justices.”)

Lodestar, originally denoting Polaris, the North Pole Star, which for millennia has served as a navigational aid, now refers more broadly to a guide, inspiration, or model. (Lode is a Middle English word meaning “course” or “way”; it’s seen also in the context of mining: A lode is a deposit of ore.) The term had a vogue this year after it was used in an anonymous op-ed in the New York Times purportedly written by a senior Trump administration official. Because Vice President Mike Pence is known to use the fairly obscure term, some people suspected him of being the author.

Laurel, the word for a tree whose foliage was used to crown victors in athletic events in ancient Greece, became a hot search term when a debate erupted online about which of two words was being enunciated in an online dictionary’s pronunciation sound file. By extension of its original definition, the term came to apply to the celebratory object itself and to figurative honors; one idiom based on the term is “rest on (one’s) laurels,” which alludes to someone who, upon achieving an honor, refrains from attempting feats that bring further recognition. (Usage generally pertains to one who does not rest on one’s laurels, meaning that person does seek other honors.)

The death this year of Aretha Franklin, best known for her rousing rendition of the song “Respect,” prompted look-ups of that word, which literally means “look back.” (The second syllable of that word, meaning “look,” is also the root of spectacle, spectator, inspect, suspect, and so on.)

The death of Marvel Comics mogul Stan Lee this year resulted in references to excelsior, the word with which Lee typically signed off in the columns he wrote for his company’s comic books. Though the primary meaning of the word is mundane—it was a trademark for a brand of wood shavings used as protective packing material and later a generic term—its origin is the Latin word meaning “higher”; excel, excellent, and so on are related.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Posted by: episystechpubs | December 20, 2018

Editor’s Corner: The Grisly Details About “Grizzly”

Two commonly confused words are grisly and grizzly. Here are the definitions from Merriam-Webster:

  • grisly: inspiring horror or intense fear; inspiring disgust or distaste
  • grizzly: sprinkled or streaked with gray

Grizzly can also be short for grizzly bear, which was probably named for its gray fur.

  • grizzly bear: a very large brown bear (Ursus arctos) of northwestern North America

Some people think that Meriwether Lewis and William Clark meant to describe the North American brown bear as scary, not gray. (They’re often both!) In 1814 (less than a decade after the Lewis and Clark Expedition), Henry Marie Brackenridge described grizzly bears as “the enemy of man” and wrote that they “literally thirst for human blood.”

The most common mistake writers make is misusing the word grizzly to mean horrible or disgusting. A Google search yields thousands of results for the phrase “grizzly details” (sic), though some of them are punning references to bears.

A less common mistake is misusing the word gristly:

  • gristly: consisting of or containing gristle (tough cartilaginous, tendinous, or fibrous matter especially in table meats)

I like to use mnemonics to remember confusing word pairs. I couldn’t find any good ones online, so bear with me as I share two that I came up with.

Tip: If something is scary, it is grisly. Grisly contains the letter S for scary.

Tip: If meat is tough, it is gristly. Gristly contains the letter T for tough.

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara, <a href="mailto:DBurcher, Jackie, or <a href="mailto:BRitter.

Ben Ritter | Technical Editor | Symitar®
8985 Balboa Avenue | San Diego, CA 92123
619-682-3391 | or ext. 763391 | www.Symitar.com

Symitar Documentation Services

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | December 18, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Onto vs. On to

‘Tis the season to be jolly! I have decorated my cubicle with a Festivus pole and covered a small tree at home with red balls and green ribbons. Usually at this time of year, I take you through the 12 Days of English and give you a gem of a countdown each day. This year, we are skipping that, and instead, I have a present for you.

Today I’m going to address a question I hear often:

What is the difference between onto and on to?

Here are a few simple rules, some examples, and a quiz—my gift to you! (The rules are from GrammarBook.com. The other things are from me. You’re welcome!)

Rule 1: In general, use onto as one word to mean “on top of,” “to a position on,” “upon.”

Examples:
Joe climbed onto the top of the dog house.
Before you come in, step onto the rug and wipe your feet.

Rule 2: Use onto when you mean “fully aware of,” “informed about.”

Examples:Don’t try to fool me; I’m onto your shenanigans.
When Steve realized Jana was onto his proposal plans, he canceled their date.

Rule 3: Use on to, two words, when on is part of the verb.

Examples:He couldn’t hang on to the rope any longer. (Hang on is a phrasal verb.)
Once you log on to the computer, you can do almost anything. (Log on is a phrasal verb.)

Quiz
1. Chad, I think climbing on to/onto that tree limb is a bad idea.
2. When I retire, I think I’ll go on to/onto take some art classes.
3. Adam stepped off the ladder on to/onto the flower bed.
4. Margaret realized her husband was on to/onto her plans to throw him a surprise party.

5. If you think it’s a good idea, we’ll move on to/onto the next step.

Quiz Answers
1. Chad, I think climbing onto that tree limb is a bad idea.
2. When I retire, I think I’ll go on to take some art classes.
3. Adam stepped off the ladder onto the flower bed.
4. Margaret realized her husband was ontoher plans to throw him a surprise party.
5. If you think it’s a good idea, we’ll move on to the next step.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services

Older Posts »

Categories