Posted by: episystechpubs | December 7, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Week 2 of Weak Phrases

Welcome to the second round of Weak Phrases!

To present ideas with confidence, you should avoid using these weak phrases. Alternatives and explanations are included in the following table.

Weak Phrase What to Say Instead Explanation
Needless to say… Nothing “Needless to say” comes from a long line of ironic phrases where you open a topic by saying you’re not going to say something, but then say it anyway. So why do it?
In my opinion… Nothing Remove the weak intro and just start.
For what it’s worth… Nothing This is another intro that makes it sound as if you’re not convinced yourself about what you’re saying. And if you’re not convinced about your point, why should anyone else be?
Sorry Excuse me It’s fine to apologize if you’ve done something wrong and need to own up to it, but too many people toss in a “sorry” and wind up weakening their image. Why say “Sorry to bother you,” when a simple “Excuse me” is shorter, snappier and less self-deprecating?

Psychologists suggest that people tend to think those who overuse “I’m sorry” are ineffectual and lack confidence. If you need more convincing, keep in mind that from the 13th century on, the word “sorry” was used to mean “wretched” or “worthless.”

I hate to ask… Nothing Just ask!
…if you know what I mean Nothing We’ve seen so many people end sentences with “if you know what I mean,” or its truncated near-twin “know what I mean?” If you’re one of them, stop now. It’s a filler phrase that means nothing—and actually irritates a lot of people.

Along the same lines, avoid starting sentences with puffy phrases like “It’s important to note that …” All you’re doing is adding useless words. Know what we mean?

If you are interested in joining the women’s BIG (everyone is welcome), check us out here. We have talked specifically about weak language in Common Grounds, a virtual space that is safe, free of judgement, and not recorded. Since we don’t record the discussions, you’ll just have to join us here for the next topic if you are interested. (Career Growth: Are There Unique Challenges for Women? Again, all employees are welcome.)

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | December 2, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Weak Phrases, Part 1

Recently, in the WomenAtJackHenry BIG, we discussed words and phrases that we want to use less because they weaken our communication. Saying words like “sorry” out of habit, when you aren’t apologizing for something you did, or using the word “just” when speaking or writing, can take all the pizazz out of your point. I usually hear these discussions centered around women in business, but this article about Weak Phrases is for everyone.

Today we’ll look at the first five phrases, and next time I’ll share the other six items with you. I’ve done a little editing for the sake of space and time.

Weak Phrase What to Say Instead Explanation
Does that make sense? What are your thoughts?

I’d like your opinion on this.

If you ask “Does that make any sense?” after you’ve finished sharing a thought, you’re immediately giving the impression that you’re not convinced yourself, that your idea might be incomplete.

Rather than seeking validation or approval, you should be asking the listener or reader for their opinions on your idea.

Maybe we should try…? Let’s try… Up until the mid-19th century, “maybe” was written as two words—“may” and “be”—which makes it clear that it literally refers to something that might happen, but might not.

That’s pretty wishy-washy when you apply it to your own ideas or suggestions. Either you believe in what you’re talking about, or you don’t.

I think this would… I believe this would… This is a minor distinction, but a valid one: “I think” sounds weaker than “I believe,” and is a little more doubtful, as if you’re saying something might work, but you’re not sure.

“I believe” puts you in charge of the thought and conveys a calm surety. And even if you’re not so sure at all, no one needs to know that!

I’m not positive, but …

I’m not sure, but …

This might be a stupid question, but…

I don’t want to sound pushy, but…

Start with what you were going to say after “but.” You don’t need to add disclaimers.

It’s an easy rule that bears repeating: Don’t put yourself down. Ever.

I just wanted to touch base … I wanted to touch base… How many times have you started an email with “Just wanted to ask you if …”? The problem in this case is that the “just” is a softener — almost an apology, as if you’re saying, “I hate to bother you, but …”

There’s a time and a place for that, but business communication generally isn’t it.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

619-542-6773 | Ext: 766773

Editing: Symitar Documentation Services

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

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Posted by: episystechpubs | December 2, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Weak Phrases, Part 1

Recently, in the WomenAtJackHenry BIG, we discussed words and phrases that we want to use less because they weaken our communication. Saying words like “sorry” out of habit, when you aren’t apologizing for something you did, or using the word “just” when speaking or writing, can take all the pizazz out of your point. I usually hear these discussions centered around women in business, but this article about Weak Phrases is for everyone.

Today we’ll look at the first five phrases, and next time I’ll share the other six items with you. I’ve done a little editing for the sake of space and time.

Weak Phrase What to Say Instead Explanation
Does that make sense? What are your thoughts?

I’d like your opinion on this.

If you ask “Does that make any sense?” after you’ve finished sharing a thought, you’re immediately giving the impression that you’re not convinced yourself, that your idea might be incomplete.

Rather than seeking validation or approval, you should be asking the listener or reader for their opinions on your idea.

Maybe we should try…? Let’s try… Up until the mid-19th century, “maybe” was written as two words—“may” and “be”—which makes it clear that it literally refers to something that might happen, but might not.

That’s pretty wishy-washy when you apply it to your own ideas or suggestions. Either you believe in what you’re talking about, or you don’t.

I think this would… I believe this would… This is a minor distinction, but a valid one: “I think” sounds weaker than “I believe,” and is a little more doubtful, as if you’re saying something might work, but you’re not sure.

“I believe” puts you in charge of the thought and conveys a calm surety. And even if you’re not so sure at all, no one needs to know that!

I’m not positive, but …

I’m not sure, but …

This might be a stupid question, but…

I don’t want to sound pushy, but…

Start with what you were going to say after “but.” You don’t need to add disclaimers.

It’s an easy rule that bears repeating: Don’t put yourself down. Ever.

I just wanted to touch base … I wanted to touch base… How many times have you started an email with “Just wanted to ask you if …”? The problem in this case is that the “just” is a softener — almost an apology, as if you’re saying, “I hate to bother you, but …”

There’s a time and a place for that, but business communication generally isn’t it.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 30, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Flashing

I just returned from a very quick visit to the Pacific Northwest, to spend some time with my dad and brother. It was a whirlwind, but I got in a great hike in the Cascade mountains one day and spent a lot of time chatting with the Church men. One morning, I walked into the living room, and I heard the guys talking about flashing.

“What the heck are you talking about? I leave for a second and you’re talking about flashing? Dad, you’re 80 years old!”

“Sorry, kiddo,” my dad replied. “We’re talking about houses and building materials.” My architect father and metalsmith brother were discussing the failures of certain metals and woods when combined with each other. Specifically, they were talking about protecting windows, roofs, and doors with new flashing. After hearing the word flashing 10 times, I finally asked them to explain what, exactly, they were talking about.

In basic terms, flashing is a material used around windows, doors, etc., to prevent water from leaking in, a particularly important consideration when three-quarters of your year is living in rain or drizzle. A more thorough definition from Wikipedia for flashing (unrelated to creepy people wearing long trench coats) is:

Flashing refers to thin pieces of impervious material installed to prevent the passage of water into a structure from a joint or as part of a weather resistant barrier system. In modern buildings, flashing is intended to decrease water penetration at objects such as chimneys, vent pipes, walls, windows and door openings to make buildings more durable and to reduce indoor mold problems. Metal flashing materials include lead, aluminum, copper, stainless steel, zinc alloy, and other materials.

There are over a dozen different types of flashing for the home, for example:

Roof flashing

Placed around discontinuities or objects which protrude from the roof of a building to deflect water away from seams or joints and in valleys where the runoff is concentrated.

Clay tile roof flashing/channel flashing

Channel flashing

Shaped like a “U” or channel to catch water (e.g., where the edge of a tile roof meets a wall).

Channel flashing (wall, flashing, roof, gutter)

Cap flashing (drip cap)

Often used above windows and doors.

Window and screen cap flashing

Chimney flashing

A general term for flashing a chimney.

Chimney flashing

Valley flashing

In the valley of two intersecting roof planes.

Valley flashing on roof

If you are thinking about flashing, the internet can provide a lot of information on how to do it. I’d stick with the home improvement sites to be safe! For other types of flashing, see the Wikipedia site.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 23, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Relative Words

This weeks emails from the Wordsmith have been about counterpart words, such as bass/treble, AC/DC, and in this case materteral and avuncular. The definitions and the etymologies are interesting, and as an aunt, I had to love materteral, even though I cant pronounce it. Here are the descriptions from the Wordsmith.

materteral

Pronunciation:

(muh-TUHR-tuhr-uhl)

Meaning:

adjective: Characteristic of, or in the manner of, an aunt.

Etymology:

From Latin matertera (maternal aunt), from mater– (mother). Ultimately from the Indo-European root mater (mother), which also gave us mother, material, matter, matrix, [KC Okay, more on this below, because I had to know the connection between mother and
matrix.] and matrimony. Earliest documented use: 1823.

Notes:

This word is the feminine counterpart of the word avuncular (like an uncle). Materteral has its origin in the maternal aunt, but now its applied to aunts on both sides, just as the word aunt originally meant paternal aunt, from Latin amita (fathers sister), from amare (to love), but now applies to aunts of all kinds (including an ants aunt).

avuncular

Pronunciation:

(uh-VUNG-kyuh-luhr)

Meaning:

adjective: In the manner of an uncle, in benevolence, affection, or good humor.

Etymology:

From Latin avunculus (maternal uncle), diminutive of avus (grandfather). Ultimately from the Indo-European root awo– (an adult male relative), which is also the source of atavism, uncle, and ayah.

Notes:

Originally the term referred to a mother’s brother, from avunculus meaning maternal uncle (paternal uncle was patruus). What’s fascinating is how it describes an uncle: avunculus, meaning a little grandfather. The word uncle is slang for a pawnbroker, so the word avuncular could also mean like a pawnbroker.

Okay, and now for the connection between mother and matrix, from my favorite people at the Online Etymology Dictionary:

matrix (n.)

late 14c., matris, matrice, "uterus, womb," from Old French matrice "womb, uterus" and directly from Latin mtrix "pregnant animal," in Late Latin "womb," also "source, origin," from mter "mother".)

The many figurative and technical senses are from the notion of "that which encloses or gives origin to" something. The general sense of "place or medium where something is developed" is recorded by 1550s; meaning "mould in which something is cast or shaped" is by 1620s; sense of "embedding or enclosing mass" is by 1640s

And in 1999, a whole new definition for The Matrix was given to us from Neo and his buddies.

Now its time to go impress the nieces with my loving, materteral instincts, and pie-making abilities.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editors Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 18, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Some Food-Based Words You May Be Saying Wrong

The holidays are coming up fast, and food is on everyone’s minds. Now that we’re starting to eat out again, or starting to think about it, I thought I’d share a list of words you might be saying wrong when you place your order.

I have visions of harried servers blowing off steam by making fun of my mispronunciations—is it just me? My husband doesn’t seem to care at all if he accidentally gets it wrong, and people find him charming. He works with a lot of Latinx folks, and they get a kick out of the way he says Spanish words with a Cockney London accent.

For those of us who are not as charming or as wildly confident, here’s a list of words along with their proper pronunciation and a brief explanation of what they actually are.

Word Pronunciation Explanation
acai ah-sigh-EE A South American superfood berry used in smoothie bowls
bruschetta broo-SKEH-tah Italian grilled bread with olive oil, garlic, tomatoes, salt, pepper, and sometimes other toppings
croissant kwah-SAHNT

kwah-SAHWN

A French crescent shaped buttery roll
crudités kroo-de-TAY Raw vegetables usually cut into bite sized pieces and served with dipping sauce
endive EN-dive

ahn-DEEV

EN-dive is a green leafy vegetable from the daisy family

ahn-DEEV is a cream-colored torpedo-shaped vegetable

gnocchi NYAW-kee Thick Italian soft-dough dumplings
haricot vert ARR-ee-coh-vehr A thin green bean
mascarpone mas-car-POH-neh

mas-car-POH-nay

Mild Italian soft cheese made from cow’s milk
Moët et Chandon mwett eh SHA(n)-doh Famous French champagne
moussaka moo-sah-KAH Greek dish of ground meet (lamb or beef) and layered sliced vegetables, often eggplant, with béchamel sauce.
phô fuh Vietnamese noodles, served in broth
quinoa keen-WAH Small protein-rich seeds from the goosefoot plant
sherbet SHUR-bit Frozen dessert of fruit juice, water, sugar, and usually cream
turmeric TUR-mer-ik Bright yellow powdered root spice
vichyssoise vee-shee-SWHAZ

vi-shee-SWHAZ

A French leek and potato soup, usually served cold

Now I’m hungry. Time for lunch!

Donna Bradley Burcher |Technical Editor, Advisory | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Posted by: episystechpubs | November 16, 2021

Editor’s Corner: (Mostly) Lucky Numbers

Good morning everyone!

Today we have the last of our articles about numbers. The focus on numbers today is on those that are a considered a little luckier in many cultures. The information here is from The Meaning of Numbers Among Different Cultures. I have made some changes to fit our style guide and trim the article a bit.

3

Most people believe in the adage that “all good things come in threes.” [KC – I have heard the opposite, too, that “bad things come in threes.”] This is particularly true in Sweden, where people consider three a very lucky number.

Three is considered the luckiest number in Korea. In Korea, the number three symbolizes control over ground and heaven because one represents the sky while two represents the earth. So, adding the two numbers produces three.

Italians associate the number three with balance and strength, which is represented by a triangle.

However, the Japanese and the Vietnamese avoid taking photos if there are only three people because of an old superstition that death will come to whoever is in the middle of the photo. [KC – Wow, that’s grim.]

7

In countries like Japan and China, the favorability of a number usually comes from the way it is pronounced or how it sounded in the local language. But in Korea, a number is considered lucky because of its concept: seven means “lucky,” which is why it is used frequently in the gambling areas in the country.

In most western countries, such as the Netherlands, France, United States, and the United Kingdom, seven is a lucky number as well. They associate it with the seven planets, seven wonders (ancient world), seven deadly sins, [KC – Um, not what I’d associate with luck, especially if you’ve seen the movie
Se7en (Seven).] and God needing only seven days to create the entire universe.

But in countries that came under Chinese influence such as Thailand and Vietnam, the number seven is an unlucky number. It’s because it represents the month of July, which is the time people pay respect to their dead relatives. People in these countries offer food items…in the hope that they will not be haunted by the dead.

8

Many religions around the world, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Taoism consider eight an auspicious number. Chinese people are particularly fond of the number eight. The number translates to bā, which sounds like the Chinese word fā, which means to generate wealth. The association of the number eight with wealth is so strong in China that properties with the number eight are considered highly valuable possessions. In Hong Kong, for example, someone paid $640,000 for a license plate number that had the particular number. Here’s another solid example—the August 2008 Summer Olympics held in Beijing officially started at 08:08:08 local time.

The number eight is also considered lucky in Japan, where it is called ya or hachi. The association with luck is in the formation for the word in Japanese characters, which gives off the idea of getting wealthy because the shape of the letter 八 gradually broadens.

666

If the meaning of number 666 in Christian countries evokes fear, this particular number is lucky for others. For the Chinese the number 666 is considered to bring good fortune because it means everything goes smoothly. Many Chinese want to have 666 in their phone numbers or license plates and are willing to pay more just to have them.

Here’s to a lucky remainder of 2021 to you!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 10, 2021

Lucky 13

In our discussion of numbers, 13 gets its own day, because while it is considered unlucky in some cultures, it is special in other cultures. I particularly like the symbolism from the Great Seal of the United States of America—something I don’t recall learning in school. The information in blue text is mine, the information in black text is primarily from The Meaning of Numbers Among Different Cultures.

13

In many countries around the world…the number 13 is considered an unlucky number.

Many believe that number 12 is a complete number, relating it to the zodiac signs and the apostles. Number association might be the reason why many cultures try to avoid number 13.

Tall buildings use different methods to name the 13th floor. The fear extends to manufacturers and companies. People avoid having 13 guests to their party or event and Friday the 13th for many is very unlucky.

There is no accepted proof that the number 13 is unlucky, but it remains a sign of bad luck due to traditional beliefs. For example, in The Last Supper, the 12 apostles were gathered around Jesus, thus there were 13 people around the table. The members of the Knights Templar were ordered arrested by King Philip IV of France on October 13, 1307, which fell on a Friday. [KC – That’s for you, Ms. Michaels.]

However, other countries and organizations are not wary of this number.

  • The Italians consider it a lucky number, as it is associated with Saint Anthony, who is the patron saint of finding lost people and things.
  • Colgate University in Hamilton, New York significantly honors number 13 as the university was founded by 13 men with a capital of $13.
  • A baker’s dozen is actually made up of 13 pieces.
  • The United States
    • Was formed from the 13 British colonies in the mainland
    • Has a flag with 13 stripes (7 red stripes and 6 white stripes)
    • Has a Great Seal with 13 stars
      • The chest shield in front of the eagle has 13 stripes.
      • The eagle’s left talon holds 13 arrows (weapons of war)
      • The eagle’s right talon holds 13 olive leaves (symbol of peace)
      • The scroll of the national motto “E Pluribus Unum” that the eagle holds in its beak has 13 letters
      • The back of the seal, has an unfinished pyramid with 13 levels

The Great Seal of the USA (front and back)

And to all of the veterans out there—thank you for your service. Enjoy your day off tomorrow!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 9, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Numbers in different cultures

After looking at the meaning of different colors around the world, one of you asked me about the meaning of numbers in different cultures. What a fantastic thought! I couldn’t wait to do a little research on this.

I reviewed several sites, but some of them seemed a little “iffy” because they were poorly written, some seemed overly religious, and others did not seem very thorough. I chose The Meaning of Numbers Among Different Cultures as my primary reference, and I’m hoping it does not lead us astray. This article, and some of the others, had the primary goal to make sure people in marketing pay attention to numbers they use while advertising in different cultures. It’s tough to sell things to people if there is the feeling of misfortune associated with the numbers you use on a home address on your billboard. On the other hand, you may be subliminally representing luck by using numbers considered auspicious in another culture, and including them on the credit card shown in an ad.

Let’s look at the numbers that tend to be considered unlucky first. (Does that mean my glass is half full? No lottery tickets for me today!)

4

The Chinese consider the number four an unlucky number since its Chinese pronunciation sounds like the Chinese term for death. Therefore, buildings in China do not have a fourth floor, well, not physically, but in the buildings’ elevators, number four is not included. Instead, they use the letter F. The same belief is true in Japan and South Korea, and other Asian countries where Chinese is spoken.

But the belief is not applicable to Germany, where the number is considered lucky, because it is associated with the four-leaf clover which is a symbol for luck.

9

The sound of the number nine in Japan is very similar to the Japanese term for torture. It’s avoided because it is considered an unlucky number. Airlines and hospitals in Japan avoid the number for this reason.

However, in China, it is a lucky number as it’s considered as the emperor’s number. Norwegians consider it a sacred number because their folklore contains many stories with the number nine.

13

[KC] I will cover this on its own day.

17

Italians believe that 17 is an unlucky number…because 17 is written in Roman numerals as XVII. When you rearrange them you will arrive at VIXI, which is a Latin term for ”I lived.” The phrase is often used in tombstones.

26

Indians would try anything to avoid the number 26, which they consider as a very unlucky number…because many tragic incidences occurred on that particular date, such as terrorist attacks, tsunamis, and earthquakes….

39

In Afghanistan, the number 39 is viewed as unlucky because it sounds similar to ”morda-gow” which translates to ”dead cow” in the local language.

666

In Christian countries, the number 666 is considered ominous because it represents the beast (Antichrist) mentioned in the Bible’s Book of Revelations.

Here’s hoping you have a lucky day!

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | November 4, 2021

Editor’s Corner: The Final Three

Good morning! Today’s colors, from What Colors Mean in Other Cultures, are the secondary colors on the color wheel: green, purple, and orange.

Green

Green shares many common meanings around the world, some of which include nature, ecology, environmental awareness, the military, and the color for traffic lights.

In Western cultures, green represents spring, money, freshness, inexperience, jealously, greed, and Christmas (when combined with red). Nicknamed The Emerald Isle for its luscious green countryside, green is the national color in Ireland and it’s associated with good luck, leprechauns, shamrocks, and Saint Patrick.

Most Eastern and Asian cultures relate green with new and eternal life, new beginnings, fertility, youth, health, and prosperity. And while this is true in Chinese culture, wearing a green colored hat for men is taboo because it suggests the man’s wife is cheating on him.

After gaining its freedom from Spain in the 19th century, Mexico chose to display green in its flag to represent independence.

Across many South American cultures that are rich in forests, green symbolizes death.

Purple

Royalty, wealth, power, exclusivity, and fame are common themes for the color purple across many Eastern and Western cultures. For many centuries, purple dye was extremely rare and difficult to produce because it was extracted from sea snails. As a result, purple clothing was expensive and became a status symbol among kings, queens, and other rulers.

Just as black is the traditional color for death and grieving in many cultures, purple shares the same meaning in some European nations, including the U.K. and Italy, as well as Brazil, Thailand, India, and among many Catholics. In Thailand and Brazil, purple is customarily worn alongside black when mourning of the death of a loved one, and in Brazilian culture, it is considered unlucky to wear purple when not attending a funeral or related service.

In the United States, purple—the symbol for honor and courage—is represented by the Purple Heart, the military’s highest award given to soldiers, sailors, Marines, and airmen for their acts of bravery.

Orange

Ever heard that adding more orange to your wardrobe will liven things up? That’s because in many Western cultures, orange is considered a fun and edgy color, and represents curiosity, trying new things, and creativity.

Certain countries also associate orange with wealth. In the Netherlands, for example, it’s the national color and represents the Dutch Royal family. But in many Middle Eastern countries, such as Egypt, orange is associated with mourning.

In Japanese and Chinese cultures, orange signifies courage, happiness, love, and good health. And in Indian cultures, it’s symbolic of fire. The orange-colored spice, saffron, is considered to be lucky and sacred.

A symbol of strength and bravery in Ukraine, orange represents a time when the country came together in 2004 and stood up to the government during one of the biggest fraudulent presidential elections in history, known as the Orange Revolution.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this voyage around the world and what colors mean to its different people.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

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