Posted by: episystechpubs | August 17, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Widow’s Peaks Reboot

Seven years ago, I wrote an article on one of the more polite nicknames my coworker Jackie gave me: Edie Munster, because I have a widow’s peak. More recently, one of you sent me an email and said:

I had a hair appointment last night, and the stylist and I got to wondering where the term “widow’s peak” came from. Any thoughts? And any other famous people besides Eddie Munster that has one?

Oh boy, do I have an answer! And I have more recent photos and updated information on widow’s peaks for you.

Today’s information is from Healthline.com.

If your hairline comes together in a downward V-shape at the center of your forehead, you’ve got a widow’s peak hairline. Basically, it’s higher on the sides and has a low point in the middle.

The widow’s peak is quite distinctive in some people, while others have just the hint of one. It may be more obvious when you pull your hair straight back.

Whether you have a straight hairline or a widow’s peak is mostly a matter of genetics.

Why is it called a widow’s peak?

The term “widow’s peak” may be a holdover from 18th-century England. Tradition was that when a husband died, his wife would wear a black triangular hat or hood with the point falling in the middle of the forehead.

[KC – Here’s an example.]

Widow’s Peak Myths

A widow’s peak is a type of hairline and nothing more, despite a few persistent myths.

Folklore would have you believe that a widow’s peak forecasts an early widowhood. There’s no basis in fact for this myth.

In television and movies, the widow’s peak tends to be a “bad guy” feature. Dracula and the Joker, for example, both have a widow’s peak.

Despite popular culture, you can rest assured that having a widow’s peak says nothing about character or personality. Consider actors in “good guy” roles, like Marilyn Monroe, Keanu Reeves, and Vanessa Williams, who all have prominent widow’s peaks.

This particular hairline is not a bad omen of any sort, nor is it a flaw. It’s just another thing you inherit from your parents, like green eyes, naturally curly hair, or dimples.

And now for some famous people with widow’s peaks:

Eddie Munster (Butch Patrick)

Chris Hemsworth

Milla Jovovitch

Kerry Washington [KC – Though her hair is usually covering it with bangs or longer styles.]

Leonardo DiCaprio

Kourtney Kardashian

And there are many more! Just search Google for “famous people with widow’s peaks” and then click Images.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | August 12, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Mondegreens to get you to Friday

Just when I think we are done with mondegreens, someone hears the wrong song lyrics in a new song, or someone writes another book about mondegreens that I have to buy. The first list of mondegreens here is from the book I’ve mentioned several times, Mondegreens: A Book of Mishearings, by J. A. Wines. The second set is from a website called Mingle-Ish.

Artist or Group Original Words Misheard Words
Simon and Garfunkel Like a bridge over troubled water Like a bridge over trouble, Walter
Simon and Garfunkel Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme Partially saved was Mary and Tom

Did Parsley save Rosemary in time?

Elton John Rocket man, burning out his fuse up here alone Rocket man, burning up the trees on every lawn

Rocket man, running out of fuel and heading home

REM We are agents of the free We are ancient Sophocles
David Bowie Ground Control to Major Tom Clown Control to Mao Tse-Tung
The Beatles Strawberry fields forever Strawberry fields for Trevor
The Beatles The magical mystery tour is coming to take you away The magical mystery toad is coming to take you away
Freddie Fender Wasted days and wasted nights Wave to Dave, and wave to Mike
Glen Campbell He’s a rhinestone cowboy He’s a vile stoned cowboy
From musical, Evita Don’t cry for me Argentina Don’t cry for me, I’m the cleaner
Shakira There’s the man I chose. There’s my territory There’s the man I chose. There’s my Teletubby.
Diana Ross and the Supremes Stop, in the name of love Stop, in the neighborhood.
Duran Duran Straddle the line / in discord and rhyme Stand on the line / in disco and rhyme
Ben Folds Textbook hippie man Texas handyman
Harry Belafonte Come Mr. Tally Man Come Mr. Taliban
Savage Garden I want your face, yeah, all around me I want your face hair all around me
Artist or Group Original Words Misheard Words
The Pretenders Gonna use my sidestep Gonna use my sausage
Tina Turner You’re simply the best, better than all the rest You’re simply the best, better than an hour’s rest
Justin Bieber ‘Cause I just need one more shot at forgiveness ‘Cause I just need one more shot, half a Guinness
Aretha Franklin ‘Cause you make me feel like a natural woman ‘Cause you make me feel like a rash on a woman
Alanis Morissette It’s not fair / to deny me / of the cross I bear that you gave to me It’s not fair / to deny me / of the cross-eyed bear that you gave to me
Abba You can dance / you can jive You can dance / you can die
Olivia Newton-John Hopelessly devoted to you I hope the city voted for you
UB40 Red red wine, stay close to me Red red wine, steak lobster meat
The Bangles It doesn’t matter that I have to feed the both of us employment’s down It doesn’t matter that I have to feed the buffalo some parmesan

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | August 10, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Yips and twisties

Hello out there! I hope your summer is going well so far. I am relieved that I finally got to see my family in the Northwest and enjoyed a week of talking, hiking, and having adventures at Mt. St. Helens, Deception Pass, Nisqually Delta, and several other beautiful places near the Emerald City.

Outside of picnics, visiting with friends, and watching butterflies hover over flowers, another thing that’s been keeping folks busy is watching the Olympics. I always try to catch some swimming and gymnastic events, and this year I’ve been following some of the news about the mental health of several athletes. In particular, Simone Biles a U.S. gymnast who had issues with the twisties. Twizzlers? Who has problems with Twizzlers? They’re delicious!

But twisties are something completely different. And apparently, they are related to something else called yips. Let’s see what yips and twisties are.

From Wikipedia:

In sports, the yips (in gymnastics, the twisties) are a sudden and unexplained loss of skills in experienced athletes. Symptoms of the yips are losing fine motor skills and psychological issues that impact on the muscle memory and decision-making of athletes, leaving them unable to perform basic skills of their sport….

Originally coined by golfer Tommy Armour to describe a sudden and inexplicable loss of the ability to putt correctly, the term has later been broadened to apply to any unexplained loss of skill, and has been applied to athletes in a wide variety of sports.

Merriam-Webster offers a little more on the topic:

In gymnastics they call them “the twisties” — when the brain and body conspire to self-sabotage. Precise moves honed over years, to be as automatic as driving a car, suddenly become a torture and a danger even for a sporting phenomenon such as Simone Biles. In golf, the putting “yips” can feel debilitating, but no one gets hurt.— Matt Dickinson, The Times (London, Eng.), 28 Jul. 2021

None of that sounds very fun. Actually, watching the gymnasts always makes me wonder, “What made these kids and their parents think jumping on a trampoline and doing backflips was a good idea?” I think I’ll stick with swimming.

Cheers to this year’s Olympic athletes! They are the best of the best, except maybe when it comes to Olive and Mabel.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | August 5, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Shake it Up

It’s summer, and we’re all looking for ways to cool down. And nothing does it better than a milk shake, right?

But wait a minute…according to a book I’ve been reading (Wicked Good Words by Mim Harrison), we might not all be talking about the same thing.

Here in California, we usually just use the term shake rather than milk shake when we’re refering to a thick drink made by blending ice cream, milk, and flavorings. But across the country, folks use different terms.

In the Northeast, a milk shake does not include ice cream; it is simply milk that is shaken up with some flavor of syrup. If ice cream is involved, the blended drink is called a number of different things.

In Rhode Island, it’s sometimes called a cabinet (so named because the pharmacist who first blended one up kept either the ice cream or the mixer in a cabinet).

In Massachusets, they call it a frappe (from the French work frapper, meaning to ice).

In other parts of New England, it’s called a velvet. And to be more specific, if you want a shake made with vanilla ice cream and chocolate syrup, it’s called a black and white. If you use chocolate ice cream and chocolate syrup (now we’re talking!), it’s called an all black.

And I learned one more interesting tidbit while researching: McDonald’s does not use the term milk shake because dairy regulations vary from state to state on what can officially be called a milk shake—it depends on the percentage of milk fat—so they stick with the term shake.

I think Shakespeare said, “A shake by any other name, would taste as sweet.” Yeah, I’m pretty sure he said that. 😊

Keep cool and enjoy this summer day.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

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Posted by: episystechpubs | July 29, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Whether or If

Good morning. I have been thinking about the easiest way to explain the difference between if and whether. By default, it seems people usually use if. But sometimes whether is the better choice and Grammar Girl did a really good job exaplaining why in a recent post. She provided this useful graphic:

And this is what makes the rule particularly important for us: she explains that “…in formal writing, such as in technical writing at work, it’s a good idea to make a distinction between them because the meaning can sometimes be different depending on which word you use.”

The following explanations and examples are from Grammar Girl’s post:

Here’s an example where the two words could be interchangeable:

· Squiggly didn’t know whether Aardvark would arrive Friday.

· Squiggly didn’t know if Aardvark would arrive Friday.

In either sentence, the meaning is that Aardvark may or may not arrive Friday.

Now here are some examples where the words are not interchangeable:

· Squiggly didn’t know whether Aardvark would arrive Friday or Saturday.

Because I used "whether," you know that there are two possibilities: Aardvark will arrive Friday, or Aardvark will arrive Saturday.

Now see how the sentence has a different meaning when I use "if" instead of "whether":

· Squiggly didn’t know if Aardvark would arrive Friday or Saturday.

Now in addition to arriving on Friday or Saturday, it’s possible that Aardvark may not arrive at all.

These last two sentences show why it is better to use "whether" when you have two possibilities, and that is why I recommend using "whether" instead of "if" when you have two possibilities, even when the meaning wouldn’t change if you use "if." It’s safer and more consistent.

Here’s a final pair of examples:

· Call Squiggly if you are going to arrive Friday.

· Call Squiggly whether or not you are going to arrive Friday.

The first sentence is conditional. "Call Squiggly if you are going to arrive Friday," means Aardvark only needs to call if he is coming.

The second sentence is not conditional. "Call Squiggly whether or not you are going to arrive Friday," means Aardvark needs to call either way.

To sum up, use "whether" when you have two discrete choices or mean "regardless of whether," and use "if" for conditional sentences.

Whether or not you found this useful, I hope you have a lovely day.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara and <a href="mailto:DBurcher.

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Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
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immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | July 27, 2021

Editor’s Corner: 100-year-old Birthday Words

Recently, I’ve known several people who’ve celebrated their birthdays. In fact, I’m preparing to make my dog a special cake for her 13th birthday. I remembered a website my former manager sent about dates—Merriam-Webster’s Time Traveler. This site lists, by year, the first time words and phrases appeared in print. Just to make it interesting, I went back 100 years, and I was a little surprised with what was new to print in 1921. Here are some of the words I was surprised about because I thought they were fairly recent and some I just liked the sound of. I’m including the words and terms, the part of speech they are used for, and their definitions.

Word Part of Speech Definition
booze cruise noun informal

a: a boat trip centered on the consumption or sale of alcohol

b: a boat trip to a location where alcohol can be purchased inexpensively (because of lower taxes or no taxes)

four-star

adjective of a superior degree of excellence, for example “a four-star French restaurant”
fusspot noun fussbudget

Synonyms: bellyacher, complainer, crybaby, fusser, griper, grumbler, sniveler, whiner

Herd mentality noun the tendency of the people in a group to think and behave in ways that conform with others in the group rather than as individuals
house trailer noun mobile home
microinjection noun injection under the microscope

specifically: injection by means of a micropipette into a tissue or a single cell

ouroboros noun a circular symbol that depicts a snake or dragon devouring its own tail and that is used especially to represent the eternal cycle of destruction and rebirth
pigboat noun submarine
roadholding noun chiefly British

the qualities of an automobile that tend to make it respond precisely to the driver’s steering

rubber check noun a check returned by a bank because of insufficient funds in the payer’s account
shih tzu noun, often with initial capitalization any of an old Chinese breed of toy dogs that have a square short unwrinkled muzzle, short muscular legs, and a long dense flowing coat

Ouroboros

Pigboat class of submarine

Peppa Pigboat class of submarine

Shih tzu, aka “walking mop”

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | July 22, 2021

Editor’s Corner: New Mondegreens for Thursday Cheer

Happy Thursday!

I thought I’d see if there was anything new on the internet about mondegreens, since those are always a popular topic. While mondegreens are generally defined as misheard song lyrics, I found a book that covers “mishearings” from many sources, including children’s rhymes, advertisements, phrases, church songs, and a whole passel of different things. Here is the first batch of items I have for you from Mondegreens: A Book of Mishearings, by Jacquie Wines. First are the original words or lyrics, followed by the misheard version or versions.

Children’s Songs and Nursery Rhymes

Mary had a little lamb / Its fleece was white as snow

Mary had a little lamb / Its fleas were white as snow

Head, shoulders, knees, and toes

Head , shoulders, sneeze, and toes

Little Miss Muffet / Sat on a tuffet / Eating her curds and whey

Little Miss Muffet / Sat on a tuffet / Eating her curtains away

Lavender’s blue, dilly dilly, / Lavender’s green

Laugh and turn blue, dilly dilly, / Laugh and turn green

The Alphabet Song

Children are often encouraged to sing the alphabet. Many, however, get stuck on the letters “L, M, N, O, P”, as these offerings show:

…L, M, N, O, P…

Elly, belly, bee

Yellow, mellow, pee

I’m a little bee

Elementary

Church Sounds and Songs

Father, Son, and…?

Father, Son, and Holy Goat

Father, Son, and the whole East Coast

Father, Don, and the Holy Ghost

Father, Son, and the Holy Smoke

Amazing grace, how sweet the sound / That saved a wretch like me!

I’m aging great, how sweet thou are / To spare a wretch like me.

Amazing grace, how sweet my aunt / Who saved a wretch like me!

Amazing grapes, how sweet thou art / To spare some for my tea.

Amazing grace, how sweet the sound / That saved a wench like me.

And I have a bit of popular music, misheard like your standard mondegreen. The original song is by Bob Marley:

I shot the sheriff, but I did not shoot the deputy.

I shot the sheriff, but I didn’t shoot him dead you see.

I shot the sheriff, but I did not shoot the dead beauty.

I shot the sheriff, but I did not shoot the dead pony.

I shopped with Cheryl…

I shot the sherry…

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | July 20, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Sawbucks and Honey Buns

Good morning!

As the credit card bills from vacation roll in, I thought it would be timely to discuss some of the slang I use when I open the envelopes. No, not the horrible language I shout for overspending, but slang for the American dollar. This is part of the list from Daily Writing Tips.

§ Big ones: multiples of one thousand dollars

§ Bones: dollars (origin unknown)

§ Bucks: dollars (perhaps from a reference to buckskins, or deerskins, which were once used as currency)

§ Cabbage: paper money (from its color)

§ Cs (or C-notes): multiples of one hundred dollars (from the Roman symbol for “one hundred”)

§ Doubles (or dubs): twenty-dollar bills

§ Large: thousand-dollar bills

§ Lettuce: paper money (from its color)

§ Long green: paper money (from its shape and color)

§ Nickel: five dollars (by multiplication of the value of the five-cent coin)

§ Quarter: twenty-five dollars (by multiplication of the value of the twenty-five-cent coin)

§ Sawbucks: ten-dollar bills (from the resemblance of X, the Roman symbol for ten, to a sawbuck, or sawhorse)

§ Scratch: money (perhaps from the idea that one has to struggle as if scratching the ground to obtain it)

§ Simoleons: dollars (perhaps from a combination of simon, slang for the British sixpence and later the American dollar, and napoleon, a form of French currency)

§ Singles: one-dollar bills

§ Skrilla: money (origin unknown)

§ Smackers: dollars (origin unknown)

§ Spondulix: money (either from spondylus, a Greek word for a shell once used as currency, or from the prefix spondylo-, which means “spine” or “vertebra”; these have a common etymology)

§ Stacks: multiples of a thousand dollars

§ Two bits: twenty-five cents (a reference to pieces of eight, divisible sections of a Mexican real, or dollar)

§ Yards: one hundred dollars

While reading through these slang words, I looked for some additional information on one of them, and found a ton of information on Wikipedia, but this was the section that related the most to the items from Daily Writing Tips.

  • $1 bill is sometimes called a "single," a "buck," or a "simoleon.” The dollar has also been referred to as a "bean" or "bone" (e.g. twenty bones is equal to $20).
  • $2 bill is sometimes referred to as a "deuce".
  • $5 bill has been referred to as a "fin", "fiver" or "five-spot".
  • $10 bill is a "sawbuck", a "ten-spot", or a "Hamilton".
  • $20 bill as a "Jackson", or a "dub", or a "double sawbuck".
  • Among horse-race gamblers, the $50 bill is called a "frog" and is considered unlucky. It is sometimes referred to as a "Grant."
  • $100 bill is occasionally "C-note" (C being the Roman numeral for 100, from the Latin word centum) or "century note"; it can also be referred to as a "Benjamin" or "Benny" (after Benjamin Franklin, who is pictured on the note), or a "yard" (so $300 is "3 yards" and a $50 bill is a "half a yard"). "A rack" is $1,000 in the form of ten $100 bills, banded by a bank or otherwise.
  • Amounts above $1000 US dollars are occasionally referred to as "large" ("twenty large" being $20,000, etc.). In slang, a thousand dollars may also be referred to as a "grand" or "G", "K" (as in kilo), or less commonly a "stack", a "bozo", as well as a "band". For example, "The repairs to my car cost me a couple grand" or "The repairs to my car cost me a couple [of] stacks".
  • $100,000 US dollars is called a "brick" or a "honey bun".

I realized my go-to term for money is buck or bucks, such as, “How could they charge five bucks for a glass of water?” After growing up next to Canada, I know they call their dollar coin a Loonie, but what other slang terms are out there? Anybody know slang for Euros? Or did you grow up in another country and learn different names for the country’s currency? I wonder if other places use food terms like us? For example, we use cheese, lettuce, and bread or dough when referring to money…do they refer to the pesos in Mexico as “queso, lechuga, y pan”? If anyone has anything they want to share—I’m all ears (or eyes).

Have a lovely day. May it be full of C-notes and honey buns.

Kara Church

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Technical Editor, Advisory

Editor’s Corner Archives: https://episystechpubs.com/

Posted by: episystechpubs | July 15, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Embarrassing but Funny Mistakes

Good morning, all!

As I was searching for topics to write about for Editor’s Corner, I came across this list called Twenty of the Worst Typos, Grammatical Errors & Spelling Mistakes We’ve Ever Seen by HubSpot, and I thought I would share the ones that are work-appropriate with you to serve two purposes: it’s an opportunity to have a chuckle, and it’s a not so gentle reminder to always edit your own writing (no matter how short).

The error is not immediately obvious in some of the images, so take your time. And remember you Symitar folk, when you’re writing something at work that you plan to publish or send out into the world, you can send it to the Symitar editing crew for a review. We’ll do our best to save you from any embarrassment. 😊

Here you go. Enjoy!

We’re having a little trouble imagining this.

Image Credit: 11 Points

Just found out The Purge actually happened.

Image credit: ViralNova

"When I grow up, I want to be a technincian!"

Image Credit: WCPO

If you think about it, it is original.

Image Credit: Slice

Best headline since "Headless Body in Topless Bar".

Image credit: The Guardian

The few and the proud.

Image credit: ViralNova

We wouldn’t take one.

Image credit: Cheezburger

Did someone actually name their kid Sport?

Image credit: Flickr

Well, at least they admit to their mistakes.

Image credit: Jazarah!

Did they edit this ad in a New York minute?

Image credit: Engrish and Funny Typos

The ultimate silver lining.

Image credit: ViralNova

Apparently, floor cloth won him seven Tour de Frances.

Image Credit: Slice

Is it proper grammar?

Image Credit: The Huffington Post

We’d buy it.

Image Credit: Pleated Jeans

What would happen if you pressed no?

Image Credit: Pleated Jeans

She doesn’t know it yet, but she’s talking about herself.

Image Credit: ViralNova

We hear he’s a little dramatic under water.

Image Credit: Pleated Jeans

Throwback to Googing things.

Image Credit: Flickr

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

About Editor’s Corner

Editor’s Corner keeps your communication skills sharp by providing information on grammar, punctuation, JHA style, and all things English. As editors, we spend our days reading, researching, and revising other people’s writing. We love to spend a few extra minutes to share what we learn with you and keep it fun while we’re doing it.

Did someone forward this email to you? Click here to subscribe.

Don’t want to get Editor’s Corner anymore? Click here to unsubscribe.

Do you have a question or an idea for Editor’s Corner? Send your suggestions or feedback to Kara and <a href="mailto:DBurcher.

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.

Posted by: episystechpubs | July 13, 2021

Editor’s Corner: Words with Different Meanings

Good morning, friends.

Kara and I receive a lot of emails from various sources to help us keep up with grammar rules, language trends, and fun facts about English. One of our new favorites is a daily email we receive called A.Word.A.Day.

Each week focuses on a new theme. A recent theme was “words with many meanings.” These are not common words like set, for which the Oxford dictionary lists 500 different “senses.” But the fact that they’re not common is one of the things I found interesting. I hope you agree.

Here are the five words, their varied meanings, and their etymology, supplied by A.Word.A.Day:

  • dobber (noun)

Meaning:

  1. An informer
  2. In cricket, a bowler, especially a slow bowler
  3. A float for a fishing line
  4. A large marble

Etymology:

    • For 1, 2: From dob (to inform, to put down, to throw)
    • For 3: From Dutch dobber (float, cork)
    • For 4: From dob, a variant of dab (lump)
    • Earliest documented use: 1836

To see usage examples click here.

A cricket dobber (slow bowler/pitcher)

  • bruit (noun or verb)

Meaning for nouns:

  1. Rumor
  2. Report
  3. Noise
  4. An abnormal sound heard in internal organs in the body during auscultation

Meaning for verbs:

  1. To report
  2. To repeat
  3. To spread a rumor

Etymology: From Anglo-Norman bruire (to make a noise), from Latin brugere, a blending of rugire (to roar) + bragire (to bray). Earliest documented use: 1400.

To see usage examples click here.

  • cameo (noun)

Meaning:

  1. A small sculpture carved in relief on a background of another color
  2. A short description, literary sketch, etc., that effectively presents the subject
  3. A very brief appearance by a well-known actor or celebrity in a film, typically in a non-speaking role
  4. A brief appearance or a minor role.

Etymology: From Italian cammeo, from Latin cammaeus. Earliest documented use: 1561.

To see usage examples click here.

A cameo carved in a shell

A cameo by Alfred Hitchcock in the movie Strangers on a Train.

  • pillbox (noun)

Meaning:

1. A small container for pills

2. A small fortified enclosure, used for firing weapons, observing, etc.

3. A small brimless hat with a flat top and straight sides

4. Something small or ineffectual

Etymology: From pill, from Latin pilula (little ball), from pila (ball) + box, from Old English, from Latin buxis, from pyxis (boxwood box), from Greek pyxis, from pyxos (box tree). Earliest documented use: 1702.

To see usage examples click here.

A pillbox enclosure

Jackie O in a pillbox hat

  • plight (noun or verb)

Meaning for nouns:

1. An unfortunate situation

2. A pledge

3. A fold, wrinkle, braid, etc. Also called plait or pleat

Meaning for verbs:

1. To become engaged to marry

2. To promise [dbb – As in “I plight thee my troth,” which you sometimes hear in wedding vows.]

3. To fold, wrinkle, braid, etc.

Etymology:

    • For noun/verb 1, 2: From Old English pliht (danger)
    • For noun/verb 3: From Anglo-Norman plit (fold, wrinkle, condition), from Latin plicare (to fold)
    • Earliest documented use: 450

To see usage examples click here.

A plight, or unfortunate situation

Have a lovely day today!

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432

Pronouns she/her/hers

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