Posted by: episystechpubs | April 27, 2015

Editor’s Corner: The Job Has Run

Welcome back from the weekend. I hope yours was as good as mine.

Today’s language tip is about tense. A few people have asked the editors to explain the correct way to talk about a job or process that has already taken place. The question is “Has the job ran or has the job run?”

Let’s start with this simple fact: the three standard forms of the verb to run are:

· run (present tense)

· ran (past tense)

· have run (present perfect tense)

Now, let’s concentrate on the one that causes trouble: have run.

So, which of these two sentences do you think is correct?

· Make sure that you have already run Daily Posting.

· Make sure that you have already ran Daily Posting.

If you’re still not sure, maybe it will be more clear if we move the word already, like this:

· Make sure that you have run Daily Posting already.

· Make sure that you have ran Daily Posting already.

Recall the simple fact we started with—the standard forms of the verb to run are run, ran, and have run—and you might be able to deduce that the correct answers are:

· Make sure that you have already run Daily Posting.

· Make sure that you have run Daily Posting already.

Tip: We use the perfect tense—and specifically the present perfect tense (have run)—to talk about things that occur at vague times in the past.

Joke: The past, the present, and the future walk into a bar. It was tense.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Technical Editor, Adv. | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

Symitar Technical Publications Writing and Editing Requests

NOTICE: This electronic mail message and any files transmitted with it are intended
exclusively for the individual or entity to which it is addressed. The message,
together with any attachment, may contain confidential and/or privileged information.
Any unauthorized review, use, printing, saving, copying, disclosure or distribution
is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
immediately advise the sender by reply email and delete all copies.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: