Posted by: episystechpubs | May 1, 2018

Editor’s Corner: A Herd of Nerds Walks into a Bar…

Over the years, we’ve covered a lot of topics such as passive voice, Oxford (serial) commas, and avoiding clichés. Of course, there are still so many things to review. Rather than review all the grammatical terms that you’ll see in these jokes today, I’ll cover most of them in the weeks to come.

Thanks to those of you who shared this list with me!

  • A bar was walked into by the passive voice.
  • An oxymoron walked into a bar, and the silence was deafening.
  • Two quotation marks walked into a “bar.”
  • A malapropism walks into a bar, looking for all intensive purposes like a wolf in cheap clothing, muttering epitaphs and casting dispersions on his magnificent other, who takes him for granite.
  • A non-sequitur walks into a bar. In a strong wind, even turkeys can fly.
  • Papyrus and Comic Sans walk into a bar. The bartender says, "Get out — we don’t serve your type."
  • A mixed metaphor walks into a bar, seeing the handwriting on the wall but hoping to nip it in the bud.
  • A synonym strolls into a tavern.
  • At the end of the day, a cliché walks into a bar — fresh as a daisy, cute as a button, and sharp as a tack.
  • A run-on sentence walks into a bar it starts flirting. With a cute little sentence fragment.
  • A misplaced modifier walks into a bar owned by a man with a glass eye named Ralph.
  • The past, present, and future walked into a bar. It was tense.
  • A dyslexic walks into a bra.
  • An Oxford comma walks into a bar, where it spends the evening watching the television getting drunk and smoking cigars.
  • A simile walks into a bar, as parched as a desert.
  • A hyphenated word and a non-hyphenated word walk into a bar and the bartender nearly chokes on the irony.

For the full list of “Bar Jokes for English Majors,” see the bluebird of bitterness website.

“Your jokes do not amuse me.”

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

Symitar Documentation Services


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