Posted by: episystechpubs | January 29, 2018

Editor’s Corner: Santa Ana Winds

I’m sure you’ve all heard the term Santa Ana Winds before, but do you know where the name came from? The definition of Santa Ana is a strong hot dry foehn wind from the north, northeast, or east in southern California.

I found an article in the Los Angeles Almanac that gives this explanation:

The original spelling of the of name of the winds is unclear, not to mention the origin. Although the winds have been commonly called Santa Ana Winds or Santa Anas, many argue that the original name is Santana Winds or Santanas. Both versions of the name have been used. The name Santana Winds is said to be traced to Spanish California when the winds were called Devil Winds due to their heat. The reference book Los Angeles A to Z (by Leonard & Dale Pitt), credits the Santa Ana Canyon in Orange County as the origin of the name Santa Ana Winds, thereby arguing for the term Santa Anas. This might be supported by early accounts which attributed the Santa Ana riverbed running through the canyon as the source of the winds. Another account placed the origin of Santa Ana Winds with an Associated Press correspondent stationed in Santa Ana who mistakenly began using Santa Ana Winds instead of Santana Winds in a 1901 dispatch.

Speaking of devil winds, the last round of Santa Anas tore down a part of my fence. Luckily, I had some old wire hangers that I used to temporarily put it back up. Don’t tell Joan Crawford though. 😊

Jackie Solano | Technical Editor | Symitar®

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