Posted by: episystechpubs | December 15, 2017

Editor’s Corner: Tenth Day of English (2017)

On the tenth day of English,

My true love did me wrong,

He forgot the pipers and sent me

Ten new ways to say “song.”

1. barcarole: a work song with a beat that alternates between strong and weak to suggest the rhythm of rowing a boat

2. canticle: a song based on scripture and performed during a church service

3. chantey/chanty/shanty: a rhythmic sailors’ work song

4. descant: a melody sung as a counterpoint to another melody

5. madrigal: a polyphonic part-song originating in the 14th century that has parts for three or more voices and is marked by the use of a secular text and a freely imitative style and counterpoint and that in its later development especially in the 16th and 17th centuries is often marked by a distinct melody in the upper voice and by being designed for accompaniment by strings that either double or replace one or more of the voice parts — compare motet [KC
– This definition is from Merriam-Webster.]

6. motet: a choral composition, usually unaccompanied, based on a sacred text

7. paean: a hymn or song of praise, thanks, or triumph

8. round: a song in which multiple singers sing the same melody and lyrics

9. roundelay: a simple song that includes a refrain

10. work song: a song structured to aid in the performance of a rhythmic group task

For an even longer list of different ways to say song, see Daily Writing Tips.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

619-542-6773 | Ext: 766773

Symitar Documentation Services

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