Posted by: episystechpubs | January 20, 2017

Editor’s Corner: A Belated Happy New Year

Happy Friday, everyone!

I know I’m a little late with this information, but I was on vacation in England on New Year’s Eve, and it was a fantastic experience. Since then, I’ve been thinking about the song we sing at midnight every New Year’s Eve: “Auld Lang Syne.” It is a beautiful song, but do you know exactly what those words mean? Do you know what language it is? The information below comes from Wikipedia:

Auld Lang Syne is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song. It is well known in many countries, especially in the English-speaking world, its traditional use being to bid farewell to the old year at the stroke of midnight. By extension, it is also sung at funerals, graduations and as a farewell or ending to other occasions. The international Boy Scout youth movement, in many countries, uses it as a close to jamborees and other functions.

The song’s Scots title may be translated into English literally as "old long since," or more idiomatically, "long long ago," "days gone by," or "old times." Consequently, "For auld lang syne," as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as "for (the sake of) old times."

Robert Burns is the national poet of Scotland. In fact, in Scotland, January 25 is Burns Night. It’s an annual celebration of the renowned poet. I was surprised to learn that the tune we sing today is not the tune that Robert Burns wrote. To read an interesting article about Robert Burns, his internationally beloved song, and his other poems and songs, click this link.

Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint stowp!
And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou’d the gowan fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fitt,
Sin’ auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin’ auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right gude-willie-waught,
For auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

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