Posted by: episystechpubs | March 14, 2016

Editor’s Corner: Gerunds

Good morning! I’m back from my vacation, and I’m all rested up.

Today I want to talk to you about gerunds. What’s a gerund, you ask? Well, it’s not a relative of the furry little gerbil or a member of the geranium family. A gerund is a word, specifically a noun, that ends in –ing.

Gerunds can be confusing because they look and sound like verbs, and they are action-oriented, but they serve as nouns. And they can serve as either the subject or the object of the sentence.

Here are a couple of examples:

· Dancing is fun.

o Gerund = dancing (subject)

o Verb = is

· I enjoy reading.

o Gerund = reading (object)

o Verb = enjoy

To refresh your memory, a subject is who or what the sentence is about. You could say that the subject does the action. An object, on the other hand, receive the action.

Here are some examples of gerunds as subjects:

· Swimming is good exercise.

· Drinking and driving is against the law.

Here are some examples as gerunds as objects. These gerunds tell you something about the subject of the sentence:

· He prefers walking his dog before daylight.

· The quilters do not like listening to heavy metal while they sew.

If you’re not done with gerunds yet, watch this video (it’s about four minutes long). I feel like I should warn you that the narrator’s voice is kind of annoying—but I’d also say that about my voice if I narrated it: http://www.elementalenglish.com/ing-action-words-gerunds/.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

Symitar Technical Publications Writing and Editing Requests

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