Posted by: episystechpubs | November 12, 2015

Editor’s Corner: Adjectives

Good morning, and happy belated Veterans Day. I’d like to thank all our veterans, all our active military, and all our military families for your sacrifices. And I’ll give a little shout out to my son in the Coast Guard.

On to the grammar question of the day. Have you wondered what the difference is between adjectives and adverbs? They serve very similar functions, so if you’re confused, you’re not alone. Today I’ll cover adjectives, and tomorrow we’ll move on to adverbs. Much of the information I will share today comes from The Only Grammar Book You’ll Ever Need (Susan Thurman, 2003).

You may remember from grammar lessons in elementary school that an adjective is a describing word. Or you may have heard adjectives described as words that modify nouns or pronouns. Both those statements are true. The adjectives in the following sentences are italicized.

· The framed picture came crashing off the wall during the recent earthquake.

· The barking dog alerted its owner that someone was at the door.

To determine if a word is an adjective, you can ask these questions:

· Which one?

· What kind of?

· How many?

The word framed in the first example answers two questions: “which picture?” and “what kind of picture?”, so it must be an adjective. Similarly, to find the adjective in the second example, you could ask “which dog?”

Just remember that adjectives describe a noun.

Until tomorrow—have fun!

Donna Bradley Burcher | Senior Technical Editor | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Extension: 765432

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