Posted by: episystechpubs | February 24, 2015

Editor’s Corner: Every Day and Any More

Good day, good people.

A while back I was asked to cover the difference between the words everyday and every day and also between the words anymore and any more. I can’t ignore the request any more, so here goes.

Let’s start with everyday and every day. According to the Grammarist website:

· Everyday is an adjective used to describe things that (1) occur every day, or (2) are ordinary or commonplace.

Example: Listening to the radio is an everyday occurrence for me.

· In the two-word phrase every day, the adjective every modifies the noun day, and the phrase usually functions adverbially. For example, every day you eat breakfast. You brush your teeth every day. Maybe you go for a walk every day. These are everyday activities.

When you’re not sure which one to use, try replacing everyday/every day with each day. If each day would make sense in its place, then you want the two-word form. Everyday, meanwhile, is synonymous with daily or ordinary, depending on its sense.

In the U.S., we also distinguish between anymore and any more. I found the following information on the Grammarphobia website.

· Anymoreis an adverb that means nowadays, any longer,or still.

Example: I don’t get the newspaper delivered to my house anymore.

· Any more is an adjectival noun phrase meaning any additional, or anything additional.

Example: I do not want any more of Grandma’s famous sweet potato casserole.

If you research, you’ll find that in Britain, the word anymore is considered an informal word for any more, and most British grammarians advise against using anymore in formal writing. Click here for more information on the British definitions, but we’ll adhere to the U.S. standards.

Enjoy the rest of your day. In fact, enjoy every day.

Donna Bradley Burcher | Technical Editor, Adv. | Symitar®

8985 Balboa Ave. | San Diego, CA 92123 | Ph. 619.278.0432 | Ext: 765432


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