Posted by: episystechpubs | December 30, 2014

Editor’s Corner: Eleventh Day of English

On the eleventh day of English

My true love gave to me

This article from Business Wee-eek.

Just kidding. It’s from Business Insider and it is called The 11 Most Common Grammatical Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. These items may seem familiar to you—probably because we’ve covered them before. In fact, you have two options today. You can click the link (above) to read the article, or you can go back and read the associated Editor’s Corner articles. I’ve listed the headings for the common grammatical mistakes here, along with our blog links.

1. "Fewer" vs. "Less"

https://episystechpubs.com/2014/05/14/editors-corner-fewer-and-less/

2. "It’s vs. "Its"

https://episystechpubs.com/2013/11/25/editors-corner-its-vs-its/

3. Dangling Modifiers

https://episystechpubs.com/2013/04/16/editors-corner-rule-5-avoid-dangling-modifiers/

4. "Who" vs. "Whom"

https://episystechpubs.com/2012/08/02/editors-corner-who-whom-the-who/

5. Me, Myself, and I

https://episystechpubs.com/2012/08/15/editors-corner-me-myself-and-i/

6. "Lie" vs. "Lay"

https://episystechpubs.com/2013/03/15/editors-corner-lie-versus-lay/

7. Irregular Verbs

KC – We’ve had several articles on this topic, but haven’t made any generalizations about irregular verbs.

8. "Nor" vs. "Or"

https://episystechpubs.com/2014/08/19/editors-corner-eitheror-neithernor-use-these-examples-instead/

9. "Then" vs. "Than"

https://episystechpubs.com/2012/11/15/editors-corner-then-and-than/

10. Ending Sentences with Prepositions

KC – Business Insider says “…don’t do it — usually.” We say, sometimes it sounds better—never say never. I can’t find our blog articles on the topic, but here’s a good response to rants on the topic, from our local grammarian and verbivore, Richard Lederer:

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/jan/18/tp-readers-decry-the-use-of-terminal-prepositions/?#article-copy

11. Subject (and Possessive Pronoun) and Verb Agreement

KC – Again, we handle verbs on a more individual basis and edit subject/verb issues when we find them. Perhaps this is an article for the future.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: