Posted by: episystechpubs | March 5, 2014

Editor’s Corner: Frequently Confused Couples

For the next couple of days, let’s have a look at some word pairs that are often confused and misused. The original list is from Daily Writing Tips; the examples are from me.

Childish/Childlike
Childish suggests immaturity behavior befitting a child, while childlike pertains to more positive qualities such as innocence and curiosity.

· Thomas was 30 years old, but his childish behavior prevented him from keeping girlfriends for long; most women couldn’t look past the messy eating, frequent tantrums, and diaper-wearing.

· Daisy’s most charming quality is the childlike way she approaches new experiences: with sheer joy and glee.

Inexplicable/Unexplainable
These words are nearly identical in meaning, but inexplicable has developed a unique connotation of an illogical or irrational quality, as in references to odd behavior or supernatural phenomena.

· To Mrs. Cumberbun’s millionaire friends, her choice to use disposable red SOLO® cups and paper napkins during the Winter Ball was inexplicable.

· The green, saucer-shaped object flying through the midnight sky was unexplainable.

Invaluable/Valuable
Something valuable has value; something invaluable has value that, because of its quality or intangible importance, cannot be quantified.

· “Babyface,” as they’d nicknamed the burglar, was known for wearing a doll mask and stealing the most valuable diamonds known to man.

· When I’m struggling for the right words, my lovely co-editor Donna offers suggestions that are invaluable to me. What would I do without her? J

Kara Church

Senior Technical Editor

619-542-6773 | Ext: 766773

www.symitar.com

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