Posted by: episystechpubs | November 26, 2013

Editor’s Corner: FAQ

Today’s tidbit is based on a question from one of our audience members. Enjoy.

Question: What is the appropriate way to refer to more than one frequently asked question (FAQ)?

Answer:

1. For the first instance of the words, spell them out and follow them with the acronym in parentheses.
Use this document to find answers to the company’s most frequently asked questions (FAQs).

2. The term “frequently asked questions” is not a proper noun, so it should not be capitalized unless part of a title.
Can you make me a list of frequently asked questions? (correct)
Can you make me a list of Frequently Asked Questions? (incorrect)

3. If the first instance of the term is in a title, do not use the acronym. Spell out the words and use rule 1 for the first instance of the term in the text.
Title: Frequently Asked Questions from New Employees
Text: This section contains frequently asked questions (FAQs) from new employees, including standard break time information, health care concerns, and time off.

4. You can use the acronym by itself after you have defined it.
This section contains frequently asked questions (FAQs) from new employees, including standard break time information, health care concerns, and time off. If you have a question you would like to add to our list of FAQs, please send it to Human Resources.

5. More than one is written FAQs, without an apostrophe.
I love FAQs! (correct)
I love FAQ’s! (incorrect)

Note: These rules apply to the use of acronyms in general. There may be a few exceptions, but nothing I can think of offhand.

Kara Church

Senior Technical Editor

619-542-6773 | Ext: 766773

www.symitar.com

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