Posted by: episystechpubs | August 1, 2012

Editor’s Corner: Common Grammar Mistakes, Part 2

For those of you who have been eagerly awaiting the next six most common grammar mistakes in social media—your wait is over! Here is part two of yesterday’s article by Deb Donston-Miller. (If you missed part one, or want to read the entire article click here: http://tinyurl.com/bqvwstk.) The text and opinions below are Ms. Donston-Miller’s; the italics below are mine.

Punctuation in General: As author Lynne Truss taught us, "eats, shoots, and leaves" is very different than "eats shoots and leaves." In addition, "Apples iPhone" is wrong; "Apple’s iPhone" is right. "Facebook, which recently went public released its first earnings report" is wrong; "Facebook, which recently went public, released its first earnings report" is right. You get the idea.

Lose and Loose: This one really drives me nuts. You "lose" your keys. The dog gets "loose."

Then and Than: If you drink too much coffee, "then" you will likely be jittery. I like the original Parent Trap better "than" the remake with Lindsey Lohan.

Using Apostrophes to Make Words Plural: This is a mistake I have seen on signs all across the country. For some reason, people seem to think that you should use an apostrophe to make a word plural. You don’t! You may say "tomato’s" and I may say "tomatoes," but unless the tomato owns something, I would be right.

I and Me: "I" is the subject pronoun and "me" is the object pronoun. If that means nothing to you (and I wouldn’t blame you if it didn’t), just use this simple trick to determine which pronoun is correct: Try the sentence with just the pronoun. So, if you have the sentence "Sally and [I/me] went to the store," which sounds right? "I went to the store" or "Me went to the store"? (Hopefully, the former sounds right to you.)

Good and Well: Watching Toddlers and Tiaras the other night (yes, I admit it), I was dismayed that every parent said to his or her child after a performance, "You did really good!" Good is an adjective; well is an adverb. The creepily made-up youngsters all did well, not good.

[KC – Suddenly I find myself cringing for repeating grammar lessons from someone watching
Toddlers and Tiaras; that I even know what that is makes me cry.]


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