Posted by: episystechpubs | February 8, 2017

Editor’s Corner: Brass Monkey

Today we have some interesting idioms and articles about monkeys!

Idiom Meaning
One monkey don’t stop the show One setback should not impede your progress.
Not my circus, not my monkey. If the situation doesn’t really involve you, it’s wise to think about why you are considering getting involved.

Two articles on the topic of this Polish saying:

· Not my circus, not my monkeys, Huffingon Post.

· Not my circus, not my monkeys. Psychology Today

I’ll be a monkey’s uncle From Wikipedia:

The term monkey’s uncle, most notably seen in the idiom "(well) I’ll be a monkey’s uncle", is used to express complete surprise, amazement or disbelief. It can also be used to acknowledge the impossibility of a situation, in the same way that "pigs might fly" is used. An example is if one says: "I may agree that if two plus two equals five, then I am a monkey’s uncle".

"I’ll be a monkey’s uncle" has been said to date from after 1925, the date of the widely publicized Scopes Trial in the United States, where the term first appears. The Oxford English Dictionary’s earliest example is the phrase If that’s a joke I’m a monkey’s uncle, from an Ohio newspaper on 8 February 1925. It was originally a sarcastic remark made by creationists. The notion "that [people] were descended from apes was considered blasphemous…by Darwin’s contemporaries", and it was for this reason that the sarcastic phrase came into use.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

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