Posted by: episystechpubs | April 15, 2016

Editor’s Corner: April Q&A from CMOS

Good morning and happy Friday!

I’m getting quite a few fun photos from you with errors on signs and public punctuation problems. You have until May 13 (midday, Pacific Time), so keep your eyes open for more and send them to my email address. You get one point for each submission. I’ll pick a “Best in Show” winner and a random winner, so the more you send in, the better your chances are.

Today, I have a few items for you from the April Q&A in the Chicago Manual of Style.

Q. If a sentence is a question and ends with a quote which is not a question, should a question mark be used, and if so, where should it be placed?

A. Put a sentence-ending question mark outside the quoted statement: Can you believe he said “I like your face-lift”?

Q. Dear wise and knowledgeable CMOS person, a fellow writer and editor and I can’t agree. She insists that “well-trained dog” shouldn’t have a hyphen. I think it must have that hyphen. We were both pretty tired when this cropped up, so we ended up barking a bit at each other. We’d like to resolve this bone of contention by appealing to you, whom we both respect and trust. Whatever you say, we’ll abide by.

A. If the dog is well trained (no hyphen), it is a well-trained dog.

KC – To break that down:

· This dog is well trained. (Well is an adverb.)

· Your fluffy Doodle-Poodle is a well-trained dog! (Well-trained is an adjective.)

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

619-542-6773 | Ext: 766773

Symitar Documentation Services

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