Posted by: episystechpubs | February 12, 2015

Editor’s Corner: Conjunction Junction

The next part of speech in our review is pronouns. I’m going to skip over that multi-day lesson and come back to it next week. Today we’re going to have a quick review of conjunctions.

Conjunctions join words or groups of words.

Back to The McGraw-Hill Handbook of English Grammar and Usage, “There are two fundamentally different types of conjunctions: coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words like and, but, and or that join words or groups of words of equal status. Subordinating conjunctions join groups of words of unequal status.”

Today we’re going to talk about coordinating conjunctions. An easy way to remember the common, single-word conjunctions is to memorize this acronym: FANBOYS.

For

And

Nor

But

Or

Yet

So

Examples of conjunctions (bold) joining words (underlined):

· Ray loves eating squid, mussels, and clams with his pasta.

· Mykela asked for us to bring biscuits or scones to the breakfast potluck.

· Zeke says there are neither towels nor soap at the hand washing station.

Examples of conjunctions (bold) joining groups of words (underlined):

· I left the picnic, for I was getting sunburned.

· It was Ginger’s turn to pick the musical, so she bought tickets for Mamma Mia.

· Zippy did not want to be a clown when he grew up, nor did any of the others at the Jokers Anonymous meeting.

For a conjunction junction treat, click here: Schoolhouse Rock.

Kara Church

Technical Editor, Advisory

619-542-6773 | Ext: 766773

www.symitar.com

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